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  1. #1
    msbarnes's Avatar
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    Leaving 120 vs 35mm film in your camera

    When I shoot 120 I oftentimes finish the roll immediately (within a few hours), but with 35mm I tend to leave it in my camera for much longer (2-3 weeks). I use the two mediums differently and so I wanted to know if I can generally get away with this using 120 cameras.

    I ask because film flatness issues are oftentimes brought up in the context of 120 cameras, but not so much with 35mm cameras. To be fair, I'm oftentimes attracted to folders and those designs are inherently more problematic.

    If the camera matters then I am thinking about smallish/compact 120 folders/rangefinders: Fuji GS645, Fuji GF670, Plaubel Makina, Mamiya 6.
    Michael | tumblr

  2. #2
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Why not? I have often left 120 film in my 67 for 3 months (winter), with no problem about flatness of the film after processing. In 35mm, a roll can last a long, long time, typically 6 months. Once film is placed in archival sleeves curling will not be such an issue, and will flatten out in short time.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  3. #3
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Camera definitely matters, as the problems with film-flatness from being left in the camera stem from the film being bent around a roller and holding that shape (hence it'll be the second shot after you've left it for a while that won't be flat.

    I can't comment on the ones that you've mentioned, but in general it's the 'back' cameras that have the problem (mamiya 645 and hassy I can vouch for) where they're bent around rollers before being exposed.
    The 'big SLR' style cameras (I can vouch for Pentacon6, but it should also apply to mamiya 6 and pentax 67 styles) take the film straight off the roll, past the shutter, then straight onto the take-up spool. Same goes for 35mm cameras, it's straight out of the cartridge past the shutter, no bending.
    I've no idea about TLRs because I don't have one, but if you've got one just look to see if the film bends before going past the shutter.
    The only 35mm cameras that might have a problem are weird ones, like 35mm TLRs or the Rollei 3000 (I don't have one, but I'm assuming that it bends film by the nature of its having a film back).
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  4. #4
    cliveh's Avatar
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    No problem.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  5. #5
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    The only problem with leaving 120 film in a 'camera' was using a Calumet roll film adapter for 4x5 cameras. The film gets bent opposite of its natural bend, and if left in that position for a relatively short period of time (overnight), the film keeps the opposite bend and is difficult to roll tightly. I had to unload the roll film back in a darkbag since light would sneak in the ends oft h e roll since it was not rolled up tight.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #6
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Roll film left in Yashica TLR's for any length of time will pick up a bend.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  7. #7
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    No problem
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The sprocket holes probably help with the 35mm.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #9
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Mamiya TLRs have a pretty straight film path and I have never had any film flarness problems after leaving films in for long periods.
    Ben

  10. #10
    msbarnes's Avatar
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    Thanks! It sounds like this isn't a serious problem--atleast not for the cameras that I'm considering.
    Michael | tumblr

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