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Thread: WLF vs Prism?

  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    WLFs provide interesting photographs looking up the subject's nasal passages. WLFs are the darlings of ENT doctors.
    Not if you hold the camera closer to your eye like Roger Cole suggests.

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Gales View Post
    Not if you hold the camera closer to your eye like Roger Cole suggests.
    ... And are same height as Roger. Shorter people may not get as good results without a step ladder.

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    ... And are same height as Roger. Shorter people may not get as good results without a step ladder.
    You know Brian, I'm 5'-8". Yeah, short! Anyway If I hold my Hasselblad with waist level finder up to my face or I attach the prism finder it really doesn't make much difference. What do I gain? About 6"?

  4. #64

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    hahahahhaha and the beat goes on n on.

    When shooting models for full body shots, using a prism at eye level makes their legs look short so a lower angle is much more apealing for longer legs n a WLF is a better tool in this case.

    FOrt portraits you will be using the 180mm lens so shooting from further back makes no difference WLF or prism but a prism will make your focusing job easier.


    so depends on the situation.

    OH I hate to get down on the floor for sit posing models, so I use my chimney finder (eq to a WLF).
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul ron View Post
    hahahahhaha and the beat goes on n on.

    When shooting models for full body shots, using a prism at eye level makes their legs look short so a lower angle is much more apealing for longer legs n a WLF is a better tool in this case.

    FOrt portraits you will be using the 180mm lens so shooting from further back makes no difference WLF or prism but a prism will make your focusing job easier.


    so depends on the situation.

    OH I hate to get down on the floor for sit posing models, so I use my chimney finder (eq to a WLF).
    Thank you, Paul. One is not better than the other and it's nice to own both to give yourself options like I said earlier.

  6. #66

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    Just have fun whatever you use, I am sure no matter what you have, you'll make it work one way or another adn eventually frustration will force you get the right tool for the job.

    Want to know why I have a chimney and a WLF and a prism?.. can't make up my mind but use em all.
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  7. #67

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    I'm a retired Union Sheet Metal Worker. I didn't love any of my tools more than the others. I just used the right tool for the job. The result it all that matters.

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    For environmental portraits, this may be correct.

    But it can gives some strange results.

    When younger, I had a very experienced photographer tell me that he wouldn't hire a wedding photographer who didn't at least have a prism finder available.

    If you use a waist level finder, there is a tendency to end up with a "naval eye view of the world" in your photographs of people.

    Which definitely doesn't result in the most flattering view of many wedding guests - including many mothers of the bride!
    Food for thought, but I probably do not agree. To clarify, I am talking about full body images, not shoulder/face portraits. I can see the point for the latter.

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul ron View Post
    hahahahhaha and the beat goes on n on.

    When shooting models for full body shots, using a prism at eye level makes their legs look short so a lower angle is much more apealing for longer legs n a WLF is a better tool in this case.

    FOrt portraits you will be using the 180mm lens so shooting from further back makes no difference WLF or prism but a prism will make your focusing job easier.
    +1 This is a better explanation of what I was trying to say.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by tnabbott View Post
    Food for thought, but I probably do not agree. To clarify, I am talking about full body images, not shoulder/face portraits. I can see the point for the latter.
    I am chuckling, because I am picturing a couple of wedding participants that I definitely did not want to photograph with a camera that emphasized the waist most of all.

    And a camera at waist level tends to do that.

    I think the most important thought for me on this issue is that a photographer needs to be able to choose the camera height that is most suitable for the circumstances.

    Tall, long-legged models showing off expensive fashions vs. people with significantly different body types and outfits - it is nice to be able to adjust.

    Here is me with the camera that I used most for my wedding work, although the lens pictured was used more for closer portraits:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Matt King-DPC-Self3-47e-2011-05.jpg  
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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