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  1. #1
    JDF
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    Downrating/uprating film

    Hi, How do i uprate and downrate film using a medium format camera. Do I have to to anything with the settings and so on.
    Thanks for any help.

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    Just alter the ISO rating on your meter. so if you are using say a 100ISO film, to uprate it set it to 125 or above. To down-rate it set it tom 80ISO or lower. Be aware though uprating and down-rating film will need the development to altered too. Less time for downrating and more time for uprating.

  3. #3
    JDF
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    Thanks for your reply BMbikerider. What the difference with push/pull.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JDF View Post
    What the difference with push/pull.
    Push and pull change the contrast rate. The effect will normally be visible in a print in the amount of detail that prints and the "snap" of the print.

    Changing the rating changes the placement of your subjects in relation to the film curve but that change is not necessarily visible in the print. For example I can easily shoot Delta 400 at ratings from 50 to 1000 and make prints that are nearly indistinguishable across that whole range.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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    Quote Originally Posted by JDF View Post
    Thanks for your reply BMbikerider. What the difference with push/pull.
    hey djf


    Quote Originally Posted by BMbikerider View Post
    Be aware though uprating and down-rating film will need the development to altered too. Less time for downrating and more time for uprating.
    it is altering the development push / pull has to do with ... leave it in the developer less when exposing the film more is pulling, and developing more when giving the film less exposure is push ...

    yeah, what mark said

    sometimes you do film tests(play with the film) and you realize, a film rated for 125 comes out best if you expose at 50 and develop "normally" its all about personal preference.

    have fun!
    john

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Push and pull change the contrast rate. The effect will normally be visible in a print in the amount of detail that prints and the "snap" of the print.
    +1

    A negative with lesser contrast (from pulling) can easily be given more contrast in post production (in digital work flow after scanning or while printing in the real dark room). However, more/too much contrast from pushing is not that easy compensated (if needed/wanted).

    In general pulling will give lesser grain and pushing will give more grain. Choice of film & developer might also influence this. But for now I wouldn't pay too much attention to this factor unless the results really annoy you. (BTW: grain is a dangerous subject in many discussions, often with many myths, (dis)believers fighting, false facts, emotions and many contradicting opinions ... be warned).


    With colour film there might also be a shift in colour - which can be nice - sometimes also combined with cross processing. My (very limited) experience on this matter is better with Fuji films than with Kodak films.

    Do experiment and do register how the film was rated, exposed, developed, printed, etc., so you can reproduce the "effect" and develop your own style. Try to change only one variable at a time, so you know what variable caused what effect.

    And don't forget to have fun!!
    Last edited by TheToadMen; 10-11-2013 at 07:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * "So much time and so little to do. Wait a minute. Strike that. Reverse it. Thank you." (the original Willy Wonka: Gene Wilder, 1971)
    * My favorite cameras: Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  8. #8
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    BTW:

    JDF - welcome to APUG !!!!
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * "So much time and so little to do. Wait a minute. Strike that. Reverse it. Thank you." (the original Willy Wonka: Gene Wilder, 1971)
    * My favorite cameras: Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  9. #9
    JDF
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    Many thanks for all your help and welcomes.



 

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