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  1. #21
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Ian is right,I for one could never get comfortable with the twin lens solution.I'm too used to SLRs.tha's why I went with the more flexible Hassy systemAlso,the 2nd-hand market is still gigantic with good deals if you are patient and know what you are looking for.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #22
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I went with the Rolleiflex. Having the built-in motor, ez-load back and electronically coupled lenses makes it less fiddly to use.

  3. #23
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    What I like about SOME models of Rolleiflex is that they make great eye-level cameras. When you open the lid and flip in the front to lower the reflex mirror, you simply give a quick peep through the lens to focus on the ground glass, then scoot up to the open framefinder for the picture. A Hasselblad is a "look down into" camera strictly. An eye-level camera is a much better people camera, especially. People do not respond well when they are looking at the bald spot of the photographer's head. People are naturally skittish enough when a camera is pointed at them. But when they see a pleasant and reassuring face behind the camera, they respond well for the snapshot. When they just see a camera with the top of your head behind it, it's much harder to get them to look towards the camera with a photogenic expression.
    This has not been my experience AT ALL. People are threatened more by feeling like something is aimed at them. They are almost universally, again in my experience, charmed and disarmed by my Yashicamat 124 used with the waist level finder (it too has a sports finder you can use at eye level) though in practice I use it more at "neck level" with it held up to my head with my eye against the focus magnifier.

    They are generally much more natural and at-ease with the WLF than with the prism on my M645 Pro, which of course is eye level.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    In this day and time, Rolleis have a weak point. When you have a Rollei with "cleaning marks" (SCRATCHES!) on the lens, the whole camera is junk, as far as worth is concerned. A Hasselblad, you can simply twist off the ruined lens and find another one. On a Rollei, when the roll of film is finished, you are dead in the water till you can complete the re-filming process. A Hasselblad is quick-change. The Hasselblad is a camera that is best on a tripod, because of it's vibration. A Rollei needs none. And if you are going to have to drag around a tripod and live with such a boat anchor, then you might as well have a LF A Rolleiflex has the edge, all things considered. But it's a mighty close shave.
    I'm really not trying to pick on you or your post in particular *g* but again, if you have a "junk" Rollei, or other camera for that matter, because of cleaning marks (yes, they're scratches, but tiny ones) please send it to me to be disposed of properly rather than tossed out.

    Seriously, you'd be amazed how scratched, dirty and crummy a lens has to be before it impacts the results very much at all. It IS true that a lot of tiny "cleaning type" scratches are apt to cause more problems than one or two much bigger and more obvious ones, mainly a reduction in contrast and increase in flare. The former can be dealt with in black and white in printing easily.

    I do agree with the rest. I don't have either camera, but I do have the above mentioned Yashicamat 124 and a Mamiya 645 Pro which have similarities in spite of the smaller format of the M645. The Hassy is far more versatile with its interchangeable lenses and backs and through the lens viewing. It can do things the Rollei can't. But what the Rollei does, it does EXTREMELY well, better for my purposes than a big SLR (at those particular things.)

  4. #24
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    Quality wise, what's the last word regarding a Rolleiflex vs. 500c+ 80mm cf?
    My flex is a 3.5f xenotar but I don't care about the max aperture, more interested in the negative...

    Why is that so? And how does it relate to the perceived comparison, "quality wise" between a Rolleiflex and a Hasselblad 500c (or any other Hasselblad)?
    In skilled, well experienced hands any camera — from a pinhole to a top-drawer Hasselblad, will deliver the results the photographer envisioned. They are, after all, only tools.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    One beautiful image is worth
    a thousand hours of therapy.


    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government
    to save the environment."
    .::Ansel Adams






  5. #25

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    You should get a Rolleiflex TLR so you can have both. Just in the past week I've had three people come up to see the Rolleiflex with admiration and ask "Is that a Hasselblad?"

  6. #26
    Bob Marvin's Avatar
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    LOL–I once had someone ask if my lowly Moscba 5 was a Hasselblad :-)

  7. #27
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    That's a tough call. I'm sure these 2 fellows debated the matter. To be sure, a Rollei operates free of vibration, a Hasselblad goes off in your hand like a little bomb.
    I vote for the Hassy because Heidecke has his pants way too high!

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Why is that so? And how does it relate to the perceived comparison, "quality wise" between a Rolleiflex and a Hasselblad 500c (or any other Hasselblad)?
    In skilled, well experienced hands any camera — from a pinhole to a top-drawer Hasselblad, will deliver the results the photographer envisioned. They are, after all, only tools.
    With a deep humbleness, I can certify you that I do make any camera sing. My question was really about sharpness and the quality of the lenses, if there was a definitive answer in regards to their quality (Xenotar VS. Planar comes to mind with die-hards in each camp, I noticed).

    After having read the entire conversation, I tend to prefer the Rolleiflex for its compactness and its general ease of use versus a more Clunky Mirror-slapping Hasselblad...

  9. #29
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    I have both and the Hasselblad gets most of the use. There is no difference in the image quality if both are on a tripod.

    Rollei TLR - one lens option, compact with waist level viewer, a bit awkward to handle, slow 3.5 lens (important to handhold), tiny filters/hood tiny tripod works fine with leaf shutter makes for a very compact kit, really poor view screen compared to acute matte in the Hassy

    Hassy - Multiple lenses, great 45 deg finders+screens, everything is larger and heavier, better ergonomics IMHO for hand holding

    I think I'd like my Rollei more with a better finder and use it when the larger kit makes no sense. Both work and have made great images. It all depends on what is important to you.
    Your first 10,000 pictures are the worst - HCB

    www.markjamesfisher.com

  10. #30
    Tom1956's Avatar
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    The best option is a EL or ELM to approach the vibration situation in Hasselblads. The weight and bulk of the motor/battery pack absorbs a great deal of the shock of mirror slap and thereby brings the Hasselblad question back on par with the Rolleiflex, which has practically nil vibration. But then, for me, the size and weight of an ELM is such that you question that if you're going to tote around that kind of bulk and weight, it may as well be a 4x5. But to be sure, and ELM is a very stable and very handy camera. After re-foaming mine, and bringing back up to snuff, mine trips off smooth as silk. Then I set it down and pick up my CM to compare, and it's like holding a little bomb when I trip it off, in comparison.

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