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  1. #31

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    A Rolleicord. Small, relatively light, and simple. I'm partial to the ones w/ the the Triotar lenses. They can be bought for a lot less money than the Tessar models, and make wonderful portraits. The three element Triotar is 3-D sharp in the center w/ very nice bokeh.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by momus; 11-28-2013 at 06:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #32
    dodphotography's Avatar
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    Ah yes, the 8x10. I have one in my arsenal, it's the heaviest thing I've ever trekked with. I have a Burke and James Commercial, they call it a field as it's not a monorail but it's also non folding, which plain sucks.

    I can't go with the a mamiya 6 or 7, I need a mechanical rig. I like to know if something mechanically breaks it can be fixed... The same can't be said for electronic items.

  3. #33

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    If you are looking for true portability in 6x7 or larger you really can't beat a folder. They fit in your cargo pants pocket' use 120 film n are real cheap... Even cheaper if you DIY restorations.

    Anothe overlooked 6x7 that has made me a fortune as a wedding photographer n has served me right to this day as a beautiful take along is the Omega Rapid. It's a fun camera to use.

    Then my street shooter is my trusty 645 ETRS. Beautiful negs n a system can be had for $300.

    If weight is a concern... Yashicamat 6x6! Dirt cheap n so much fun to use. Beautiful camera at a bargain basement price.
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  4. #34
    dodphotography's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul ron View Post
    If you are looking for true portability in 6x7 or larger you really can't beat a folder. They fit in your cargo pants pocket' use 120 film n are real cheap... Even cheaper if you DIY restorations.

    Anothe overlooked 6x7 that has made me a fortune as a wedding photographer n has served me right to this day as a beautiful take along is the Omega Rapid. It's a fun camera to use.

    Then my street shooter is my trusty 645 ETRS. Beautiful negs n a system can be had for $300.

    If weight is a concern... Yashicamat 6x6! Dirt cheap n so much fun to use. Beautiful camera at a bargain basement price.
    I'm definitely not bound to 6x7, in fact I think I'd rather 6x6.

  5. #35
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dodphotography View Post
    I'm definitely not bound to 6x7, in fact I think I'd rather 6x6.
    Mamiya-6 Folder is a wolf in sheep's clothing.

    Film plane coupled rangefinder focusing, slide in pressure plate to ensure film stays flat, Olympus Zuiko lens that is pretty sharp, bright viewfinder for the period, frame counter wind-on. Fits in a jacket pocket. It needs a Leica style adapter for the cable release.

    (is from bokuwanihongasuki's photostream on flickr)

    You wouldn't want to part with it once you'd used it a couple of times. (This is actually a problem, folks want to keep them, so they are not freely up for sale like the Zeiss folders are...)

    RR
    Last edited by Regular Rod; 11-29-2013 at 11:03 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #36
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    in my opinion ,the Msmiya 6 is by far the best MF travel camera.It combines light weight with optical excellence and simplicity of operation; I recommend the 50,75 and 150mm lenses for it. It won't let you down; one disadvantage is that it cannot be used as a boat anchot. your RB67 is much better for that.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #37

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    The RB is a handful. I haven't tried the left hand grip yet but I think a Bronica GS-1 with a Speed Grip is easier to hand hold. When I want to use a medium format camera which isn't too heavy I take a Bronica SQ-A with a Waist Level finder, back and 80/2.8 lens. It's a lot lighter than the RB and I don't mind the laterally reversed image. Even with a prism finder and Speed Grip is isn't too bad but it is heavier.

  8. #38
    hsandler's Avatar
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    Assuming you like ground glass viewing, as well as inexpensive, try a Japanese TLR like a Yashica Mat, Autocord or Diacord. They have fairly bright viewing screens and decent Tessar-type lenses. Personally, I don't see what the big deal is about strictly mechanical cameras though. An SLR with an electronically-controlled shutter, like a Bronica ETRS or SQ series will have accurate shutter speeds, and the battery lasts and lasts (if you are not using a metering prism). You can carry a spare silver oxide battery in a little pocket of your bag if you are concerned and you are good for years. My ETRSi seems to work fine even in freezing conditions. An SQ or ETRS with normal lens and WLF is about the same size and weight as a TLR and somewhere in price between a Rolleicord and a lower end Rolleiflex. The main thing to keep it light and compact is to use the WLF and not a prism or speed grip.
    Last edited by hsandler; 11-29-2013 at 07:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #39

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    Batteries have come a looooong way. Read this: http://www.dantestella.com/technical/mechanical.html.
    My Mamiya 645 Pro is still running on the same batteries for at least the last 2 years, both the winder and the camera with a metered prism. Spare batteries and the hand crank in the camera bag. There are also low self-discharge NiMh batteries nowadays, search for "Sanyo Eneloop".
    Last edited by spijker; 11-29-2013 at 08:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #40

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    Correct, the laws of physics and chemistry say that only at 0░K (-273.15░C) it all ends. Above that temperature it's "just" a matter of using the right materials. And that's where technology and innovation kicks in.

    I have photographed at -25░C, both in Canada and Kazakhstan with 35mm SLR & DSLR cameras. It worked and I think that on those occasions I was more bothered by the cold than the cameras. :-) Different example, my car with a diesel engine always starts without a problem after having spent the whole day in the parking lot at -20C. It gets that cold here. Different type of battery and a different application but it works.
    Last edited by spijker; 11-29-2013 at 08:47 PM. Click to view previous post history.



 

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