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  1. #1
    Rob MacKillop's Avatar
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    1st shots with Mamiya 140mm Macro on RB67

    Lugged my RB67 Pro SD up the hill to do a few test shots with the 140mm f/4.5 Macro C, with extension tube no.1, and some Velvia 50. I love this lens! The Velvia is easy on the eye too. Hope you like them... If only I could put this camera in my pocket.

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  2. #2
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Very nice!

    Question, what is the point of the macro lens, I do a lot of macro work but always just use any lens with the extension tubes and the bellows of the camera body... So, what's the lens do differently?

    Thanks!
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #3

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    Great photos. In wish mine was small too.

    Jeff

  4. #4
    Rob MacKillop's Avatar
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    Stone - You need a technically-minded person to explain that, which I'm not. But, roughly speaking, although the Mamiya 140mm doesn't get in any closer to your subject than any other lens for the same system, it does give a sharper focus as well as a softer transition to out of focus areas - or so I read. I'd be happy for someone else who knows what they are talking about to chime in...all I know is that it gives a nicer (the best word I can think of right now) image than any other lens I have.

  5. #5
    Rob MacKillop's Avatar
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    Jeff - Your what?

  6. #6
    Rob MacKillop's Avatar
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    Oh, you mean the camera?! Doh! Not sure what you were talking about for a second there!

  7. #7
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Oh, you mean the camera?! Doh! Not sure what you were talking about for a second there!
    Not many wish THAT was smaller....
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #8
    Rob MacKillop's Avatar
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  9. #9
    KennyMark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Very nice!

    Question, what is the point of the macro lens, I do a lot of macro work but always just use any lens with the extension tubes and the bellows of the camera body... So, what's the lens do differently?

    Thanks!
    Stone,
    Most lenses have a curved field of focus. Macro (or as is technically correct, Micro) lenses are generally designed to have a flat field of focus, in addition to having fewer optical problems (such as chromatic aberation for one possible issue) when focused closely. This is a gross generalization, so there will always be exceptions, but I know that you have experience in using the google for a better explanation than mine.
    If you call it a "prime lens" because it's a fixed-focal length (i.e. not a zoom lens), then as Inigo Montoya said so eloquently, "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KennyMark View Post
    Stone,
    Most lenses have a curved field of focus. Macro (or as is technically correct, Micro) lenses are generally designed to have a flat field of focus, in addition to having fewer optical problems (such as chromatic aberation for one possible issue) when focused closely. This is a gross generalization, so there will always be exceptions, but I know that you have experience in using the google for a better explanation than mine.
    +1

    True macro lenses are optimized for close work. Non-macro lenses are optimized for farther distances.

    The Mamiya 140mm C lens is a true macro lens. The adjustable floating element means that it also performs quite well at farther distances.

    In the 35mm world, you have to be careful. There are lenses out there that are labelled "macro" which more properly should be labeled "can work close".

    Flat-field performance matters the most for flat subjects.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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