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  1. #21

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    Traveled the world in my Navy career with a Nikon Ftn a Nikonos 2 and a Rollie T collected along the way. First it must be comfortable in your hands and operate logically for you with control placements. My father had Kodak folders with prism finders. TLR was not a big jump to something I was not used to. Weight is always a personal issue. It must be handy while operating not a burden. My Nikon F was always too heavy for my wife to be happy shooting it and she loves her Nikon DSLR. Then there is the square format vs the rectangular. Shooting 'square' you have to remember there are both a vertical and/or a horizontal print format most likely to follow. And then there is the "I just want to try that" adventure. No right, no wrong, just learning. Go for it with what is available in your price range.

  2. #22

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    I've traveled with several differnt types of MF cameras (TLR, vintage folder, SLR, and press) and found my best results to be with a Rolleicord and Weston III meter. Simple, affordable, and lightweight. Other options will work but for me this was the most convenient. The most difficult was a press camera... mostly because of the bulk. With all of them I bring a monopod!

  3. #23
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheToadMen View Post
    For traveling light I take my Bronica RF645. Easy to handle, rather compact and light. Has a very good build-in light meter. And the glass is excellent!!
    And did I mention the excellent rangefinder on this camera?
    +1

  4. #24

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    I tend to favour a rangefinder for travel these days, especially if travel is the primary objective, not photography. GS645s or Mamiya 6 work well. The little Fuji is very light, and the 6x4.5 format is good enough. The M6 does offer a choice of lenses, but sticking to the standard 75mm means you can hang it under a jacket easily.

    I've used a YashicaMat for travel, especially where I will have a little more time. I also find the 'box' packs well as a backup camera.

    If photography is not the primary reason for the trip, just pick something that you can carry easily if you do not have a secure storage location. If it is a chore carrying it, you won't want to use it.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  5. #25
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ww12345 View Post
    Hasselblad. Changeable film backs and not heavy at all (only about as heavy as a Rollei)...
    +1
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #26
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I've travelled with a Hasselblad - it's a beautiful camera no doubt, and enormously capable. But I still wouldn't call it travel-friendly. Having the ability to change lenses and backs invites you to bring along multiples of each, at which point you're no longer light-weight and compact. I had my Hassy outfit with me in Spain back a few years ago, which was 3 backs, a 500 C/M, 50, 80 and 120 lenses, and a Superwide. Well, that filled a LowePro backpack with built-in waist support. All in all the bag plus the gear was tipping the scales around 30 lbs. I got great shots, but even with the ergonomic backpack I was regretting the weight. In the circumstances, the Hasselblad became a Bloody Hassel!

  7. #27

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    Yeah, I would probably just advocate a color back and a B/W back (one always on the camera, so only one extra back) and a wide (ex:50mm) and regular (ex:80mm). Only one extra lens and one back shouldn't be too bad. I know what you mean about becoming a pack mule, though. I do it all the time, fortunately with Leica TM stuff so it's lightish but still...

  8. #28

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    Fuji GA645, GA645W, or both . I can pack one of these 2 with a 135 system (1 body and 3 lenses) in a messenger bag. Without a flipping mirror, Fuji GA645 can be handheld @ 1/15 shutter speed.

  9. #29
    piu58's Avatar
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    I found the FUJI GA645zi to be a fine travel camera: Small and light (for a mf camera), all ist automatic, and you have a zoom lens of decent quality. You have even a flash which I don't use. I often travel with my Rolleiflex too, but with the Fuji most things are easier: Point and shot. No focussing, no light metering. I makes the live easier if I accompanied by my wife.
    Last edited by piu58; 12-12-2013 at 12:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    ---
    Uwe Pilz

  10. #30
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L Gebhardt View Post
    Mamiya 6 or 7 if you want interchangeable lenses and a very small kit. I love my Hasselblad too, but it's bulkier and requires a tripod more often.

    Agfa Super Issolette (or Ansco Super Speedex is the same) if you can live with a single normal lens. These fold up nice and small and take excellent pictures with a look that is more classic than modern.
    Super Isolette is very good but I find that I need kind of lock that prevents the release of the folding plate.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

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