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Thread: Light meter

  1. #11

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    Since the Pentax digital spot meter is out of your budget and you want a spot meter you might take a look at the analog Pentax Spotmeter V or a Soligor.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raffay View Post
    Hello,

    I am getting a Mamiya RZ67 PRO II, yes I am very excited!!! Since I would be using the WLF, I assume I would have to meter independently. Any suggestions for a good light meter, I always wanted a Pentax spot meter but it is way outside budget for now, any cheaper alternative that will do the job decently.

    Cheers
    Raffay
    Sounds great!

    I don't know what kind of photography you will do with the RZ. If you are working in environments with varying light, it could be better to get a metered prism. That will allow you to shoot faster and with less hassle. The RZ67 is quite a lot of camera to handle even without holding a light meter. If on the other hand you will be shooting slow/static or in controlled lighting, no issue with hand-held meter.

    There is also a little trick that could tie you over if you get stuck without a light meter, an iPhone app called Pocket Light Meter:
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pock...381698089?mt=8

    It's surprisingly accurate and the extra benefit is that you can move the metering spot around, for instance in a scene with a lot of unevenly lit surfaces to get the exposure you want. I still use it in the field to check the readings on my older analog cameras that don't like modern batteries. I've also used it for medium format photography with good results.

    My guess, though, is that if you shoot a lot with the RZ67 and like to move around you'll get tired of using a hand-held meter and either start guestimating exposure settings or get a metered prism.
    Last edited by Jaf-Photo; 02-24-2014 at 11:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    I find a digital readout on a meter slow to read. Much prefer an analog meter. Are you going to be in good light most of the time, w/ just an occasional foray into the indoors? Then I highly recommend a small and light Sekonic L-188. Very simple and clean interface, plenty accurate for what I described, and they go for about $25. Takes the ubiquitous and cheap 1.5V button batteries.

    Are you going to be shooting in low light a lot? My go-to meter for that is a little bigger (but still considerably smaller than a Lunasix), a Gossen SBC Super Pilot w/ a silicon cell and again, a simple and quick-to-read layout. VERY accurate in low light....the best hand held meter I've ever owned. About the size of a pack of unfiltered Camels. I paid about $30 for mine. It has a bridge circuit so it works on both 1.35V and 1.5V button batteries.

    Used to have a Sekonic L 308 meter and I hated it. Slow to read, and you had to point it while holding it upright like a Star Trek communicator. It attracted too much attention. A Pentax spot meter would be even worse in that regard. Like JP said, if you can get an accurate metered prism, that would be best perhaps. You're going to be carrying around a beast of a camera already, so think small and light to help on that issue.
    Last edited by momus; 02-24-2014 at 01:16 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14

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    I have a Pentax spot meter that I had calibrated by Quality Light Metric last year but I only use it perhaps 5% of the time as I generally use a pair of tiny Gossen Digisix meters, one lives in my LF pack permanently and the other is a floater from my Leica bag to my Hassy bag. The meter will fit in the smallest pocket you can imagine, battery life is outstanding and the long scale is really nice to have when extrapolating for things like ND filters. They read in EV numbers which over time are a lot easier to use as they commit to memory like EV 12 is 250th @F4, etc...

    The spot meter app on the iPhone is also very good, works in a pinch every time.

  5. #15
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elekm View Post
    Here's my thought. If you plan to spend a lot of money to buy a very good camera, spend a bit more to buy a decent meter. A good light meter is a purchase for life. That is, buy a good meter - even if it costs a bit more than you planned to spend - and you never have to buy another.
    These sorts of thread questions will always produce at least one happy user for virtually every meter (or other piece of equipment) ever made.

    But the above advice is crucial. I happen to still be using a mid-1980s era Sekonic L-398 incident-only meter that continues to work perfectly. I had to (really, really) stretch at the time to buy it. But I've never had to buy another, so it's now arguably one of the least expensive purchases I've made.

    Don't skimp on one-off lifetime purchases.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by elekm View Post
    a Sekonic L-508 ... can do reflective, incident, spot and flash. .
    It only does reflective metering in spot mode, surely?

  7. #17

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    Correct, although it's a variable spot from 1 to 4 degrees.

    I use it in incident most about 90% of the time and in reflective/spot mode for the other 10%. I haven't used the flash meter - I just don't shoot that much flash, and to be truthful, I'm sort of dumb when it comes to measuring that.

    I still that my original comment about buying a quality light meter is the correct approach, especially if you plan to spend a large amount of money on a medium format camera. Buying such a camera means that you care about image quality, so cutting corners on the meter doesn't make sense, especially because a correctly (or incorrectly) metered scene will have a big impact on the resulting negative and print.
    Last edited by elekm; 02-24-2014 at 04:08 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by elekm View Post
    Correct, although it's a variable spot from 1 to 4 degrees.

    I use it in incident most about 90% of the time and in reflective/spot mode for the other 10%. I haven't used the flash meter - I just don't shoot that much flash, and to be truthful, I'm sort of dumb when it comes to measuring that.

    I still that my original comment about buying a quality light meter is the correct approach, especially if you plan to spend a large amount of money on a medium format camera. Buying such a camera means that you care about image quality, so cutting corners on the meter doesn't make sense, especially because a correctly (or incorrectly) metered scene will have a big impact on the resulting negative and print.
    So what is the verdict.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  9. #19

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    In terms of the cheapest that will do the trick, and the best recommendation.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  10. #20
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Any old analogue Pentax Spotmeter. Consistent, reliable, and nowadays inexpensive. I now have four, one for each bag so I never forget to take one with me. Not one of them exceeded £60 to buy and two of them were less than £30 each. They all give the same reading so that suits my way of working fine.

    I got each of them over time from eBay...

    RR

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