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  1. #11
    omaha's Avatar
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    I've been shooting a lot of Portra 160 lately. It does seem to have a nearly limitless (ok, not literally, but you know what I mean) ability to receive light and still retain detail. If you err, err on the side of more exposure rather than less.

    That was one of the biggest humps on my learning curve when I went back to film from digital. With digital, you can always pull up the shadows but blown highlights are unrecoverable. With Porta, I don't worry so much about highlights getting over-exposed. The film LOVES light.
    Last edited by omaha; 02-28-2014 at 11:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I shoot digital when I have to (most of those shots end up here) and film (occasionally one of those shots ends up here) when I want to.

  2. #12
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    I suggest you buy yourself a light meter.
    Ben

  3. #13

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    Like most people have already said, error on the side of over exposure. I shoot Portra 160 at 100, it is what I set my light meter at. Lovely film by the way, and great camera too.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I'm not sure that is the case for the shutter speeds - some cameras yes, but does it apply for this Rollieflex's shutter?
    Matt, you're right about the shutter speeds. Thanks for correcting me.
    “You seek escape from pain. We seek the achievement of happiness. You exist for the sake of avoiding punishment. We exist for the sake of earning rewards. Threats will not make us function; fear is not our incentive. It is not death that we wish to avoid, but life that we wish to live.” - John Galt

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I suggest you buy yourself a light meter.
    Try PeterLoy he normally has a Weston.
    Rare I get more light than 1/60 /5.6 for 160ISO, lots of umbrella shots.

  6. #16

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    I'm another one to err on the side of slight overexposure, so where you don't have a shutter speed that's exactly what sunny 16/England 11/etc. would dictate, use the next slower (longer) one, not shorter. But also on a camera with a 70-year-old mechanical shutter, even after a CLA, we're engaging in wild speculation here unless & until you know that the stated shutter speeds are spot-on. It could be that your 1/300th setting actually yields a 1/160th exposure, for example. Did Mr Mickleboro run it on a shutter tester and give you the results? If not, you might want to invest in one of the mobile phone-based testers, or build one of some kind, to get that sorted.

    --Dave

  7. #17

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    Thanks everyone for your suggestions - I have downloaded a couple of lightmeter apps and will compare them to the two new meters I won on ebay (£1.04 and £0.95!). I have kept a record of the settings (and already managed a double exposure!). When I tested the meter apps against the white side of my house (it was sunny), it matched the sunny 16 settings!

    Is there somewhere on APUG where I post the findings (and pics if any are worth showing!)?

    One thing I did notice - when you want to get rid of film, there is nothing to shoot!

    Regards

    Carl

  8. #18
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    For Portra 160 colour negative film, based on my experience with FP4 and in our present climate, I would suggest 1/125 at F8.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #19
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I'm not sure that is the case for the shutter speeds - some cameras yes, but does it apply for this Rollieflex's shutter?
    On the old Compurs, like in the Old Standard, you can set it to speeds between the marked values, like between 1/50 and 1/100 for 1/75 Except between 1/10 and 1/25 or between the next-to fastest speed and the fastest speed (1/100 and 1/300 or 1/250 and 1/500 depending on the shutter model). That's important to remember, because between 1/10 and 1/25 the shutter engages the "clockwork", and for the fastest speed a booster spring is used.

    Intermediate speeds can be set between these marked speeds:

    1 and 1/2 sec
    1/2 and 1/5 sec
    1/5 and 1/10 sec

    1/25 and 1/50 sec
    1/50 and 1/100 sec
    1/100 and 1/250 sec (only on the cameras with 1/500 as fastest speed!)

    IMPORTANT! Not between these speeds:

    1/10 and 1/25 sec
    1/100 and 1/300
    1/250 and 1/500
    J. Patric Dahlén

  10. #20
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by omaha View Post
    With Porta, I don't worry so much about highlights getting over-exposed. The film LOVES light.
    Yes, and with portrait films you lose contrast fast with under-exposure. The Rolleiflex Old Standard models have uncoated lenses which gives a bit lower contrast than later Rolleis with coated lenses, so it's a very good idea to expose a portrait 160 film at 100.
    J. Patric Dahlén

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