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  1. #31

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    I was in a similar position and spent months obsessively analyzing the scene... Hasselblad really does it for me. I absolutely love everything I've seen and touched there the most... But knowing that I am not going to switch to majoring in film and minoring in digital any time soon, I couldn't justify doing whatever I would need to do to get into a Hasselblad rig (which would involve needing to sell off digital gear for sure). I eventually decided to start out spending as little as possible to get in the game and ended up with a TLR (124G) that only set me back about $170... I've only made my way through one roll of film since I got the camera a couple months ago, so I know I made the right choice for me. I do hope to own a Hassy someday, but I like the feeling that I don't have to be in a hurry to get there.

  2. #32

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    The thing with a Hasselblad isn't the basic setup. It's when you go to buy a second or third lens. Those older Zeiss lenses continue to command top dollar.

    I was out today with a Super Ikonta B (532/16), and it reminded me of how much I enjoy shooting this camera. This camera uses the Zeiss Ikon rotating wedge-prism rangefinder. It almost never falls out of calibration, because there aren't any prisms or mirrors to knock off their mounts. All older cameras should be serviced, if they haven't been serviced.

    Having used both a Rolleicord and a Rolleiflex, I would go with the Rolleiflex as being more comfortable to use. For the stated budget, a very good Rolleiflex Automat with a coated Xenar or Tessar is well within reach.

    I think the Rolleiflex T is a cult camera that is not deserving of its lofty price.

    But there are so many choices out there that you could easily buy a camera, try it, and if it doesn't feel right, you can sell it for the same price. After all, these are all used cameras.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by elekm View Post
    The thing with a Hasselblad isn't the basic setup. It's when you go to buy a second or third lens. Those older Zeiss lenses continue to command top dollar.
    How so?

    C lenses are super cheap now, that is what you meant by classic, right? CF lenses have come down a lot too, you can get the 50FLE, 100 CF and 180 CF for $600-$700 if you try, filthy-dirt cheap.
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  4. #34

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    I guess affordable is relative to your economic situation. For me, $600 is still a sizable amount of money. Relative to their original cost, yes, it's cheap.

    I did make a mistake in using the term "top dollar." I should have said they they are still costly - again, depending on what each of us consider costly and "super cheap."

  5. #35
    Zathras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    What will you do with 6x6 negatives ? Scan or print ? Do you have a suitable enlarger ? What is your enlarger lens ? What is your paper and paper developer ? How do you like to develop your films ? Do you know the difference of lenses characteristics of different brands , schools ?
    M7 and M9 in 6 months ? I bet you can hire a national geographic team to shoot for you at amazon or deep africa ! I bet you will dislike your hasselblad in next month and turn to iphone.


    Looks like someone forgot to take his medication!
    When the chips are down,

    The buffalo is empty!!!



  6. #36

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    Get a Bronica S2a, robust, cheap lenses and accessories, good IQ.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Hasselblad is the only complete system. Further there are new and used parts easily available. Service is available and easily accessed. None other compare. End of story.
    Bronica made a good system. Hasselblad themselves pissed on their own legacy when they abandoned the square format in favor of 645 with digital.

  8. #38
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elekm View Post
    I guess affordable is relative to your economic situation. For me, $600 is still a sizable amount of money. Relative to their original cost, yes, it's cheap.
    The most I have ever paid for a second hand camera is £20.00 (about $30.00-ish) - and I still haven't mentioned it to Bestbeloved!. You cannot really advise on these questions without knowing a lot about the questioner's finances. If I was interested in 6x6, I would buy a £10.00 folder (Zeiss Ikon Nettar was my first) and see how I liked the pictures compared to those from my other cameras. I would worry about a Hasselblad when I was taking 6x6 most of the time.

  9. #39
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RyanC View Post
    I'm very much a one camera, one lens sort of guy. In fact, I only own two lenses... A 35mm lux and a 90mm el marit. The 35 is mounted 95% of the time... So maybe a TLR is something I should look at.

    I assume the the folders from the 1950s are pretty far behind the standards of most?
    I have an Ansco Super Speedex (Agfa Super Issolette for the US market). I really like the Ansco. It's small, so I take it with me a lot. It's sharp, and the lens has a very nice "classic" rendering that my other systems don't have. It also has a coupled range finder so you can actually control the focus, which I find difficult with the zone focused folders.

    I also have a Hasselblad system, which is also great. But it's much to big to be a daily carry camera. I wouldn't want to be without either camera.

  10. #40
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L Gebhardt View Post
    I have an Ansco Super Speedex (Agfa Super Issolette for the US market).
    So have I. Mine is the Special R model which makes it the same as an Isolette III with an uncoupled rangefinder.

    I can't fault it on anything.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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