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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Your friend is called 'neutral density filter'. Put Tri-X in the camera and a 3 stop neutral density filter. Remove it when it gets darker.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12

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    Also, if you get a MF camera that has removable backs, you will never be in a situatoin where you need to take pictures outside on a sunny day and you are stuck half way through a 36 exp roll of 3200 iso film. Therefore, if you ever find yourself in a situation where shutter speed is limiting you can do like others suggested and get ND filters, or you can get an extra back to load with PanF for those situations.

  3. #13
    winger's Avatar
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    The main reason dSLRs have such fast speeds is because you can use an iso of 12000 with many of them. That is not usually the case with MF. Most of the time, iso 100 to 400 is common and I've never used a speed faster than about 1/250 with my Pentax 645N. While I can use it handheld, it's on a tripod probably 75% of the time. Even the few rolls of 3200 I put through it were shot at speeds slower than 1/125.

  4. #14
    fretlessdavis's Avatar
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    It hasn't affected me. I rarely use the 1/1000 speed on my MX, as it's actually more like 1/800. I've shot plenty of 35mm cameras (old Spotmatics and Russian M42 cameras) with a 1/500 top speed, and it never really limited me. With my MF system, I find I'm usually 1-1.5 stops more closed down vs. 35mm for similar situations. I think I've only used the top 1/500 on my ETRS 5 or 6 times so far-- I'm usually hovering right around 125 or 250.

    The fastest film I currently shoot, though, is FP4+, so YMMV.
    New-ish convert to film.
    Pentax MX for 35mm
    Bronica ETRS for 645

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The Mamiya 645 Super, 645 Pro, 645 Pro Tl and 645e all offer 1/1000 of a second. All but the 645e offer everything else on your list.

    I do sometimes use 1/1000 of a second, when I want to minimize depth of field, but not usually. And 1/500 will usually serve as well.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16
    pixelrandy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The Mamiya 645 Super, 645 Pro, 645 Pro Tl and 645e all offer 1/1000 of a second. All but the 645e offer everything else on your list.

    I do sometimes use 1/1000 of a second, when I want to minimize depth of field, but not usually. And 1/500 will usually serve as well.
    Ah, I was just going to suggest the same thing. I use a Pentax 67 (1000th, but fixed back) and a Mamiya ProTL 645. Metered prism available, motor drive grip, 1000th, etc. I have virtually zero complaints with my Mamiya. I'd say I have used 1000th just to keep shallow DOF in certain situations. However stopping down to f/4 from f/2.8 and shooting at 500th probably wouldn't have affected the look of the shot noticeably enough. I'd be perfectly content in fact if the Pro TL maxed out at 500th.

    Happy shooting!

    Randy

  7. #17

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    hi op

    it all depends on the type of photography you want to do ..
    portaits, landscapes, architectural or aeial, scientific / wildlife
    racecar, or photographing things which have quickness and are relatively close.
    while many of my cameras/ shutters go beyonf 4-500, others dont
    and it hasnt been trouble ,
    but then again i dont really do things where i am photographing fastthings

    good luck with your purchase
    Last edited by jnanian; 03-06-2014 at 04:45 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: cant spell
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
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    PM me for details

  8. #18
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    With MF and my genre of work, I very rarely go beyond 1/30 second and nowhere near the 1/1000 snitch of a heavy-hitting P67. The highest I've ever used is 1/2000 years ago with my EOS 1N and 85mm f1.2 (a once only event; the lens was then disposed of). It is unlikely you will need very high shutter speeds with medium format; it is not the format for high speed action e.g. sports, of which fast and nimble 35mm cameras are much better suited. Some portraiture requiring high flash sync speeds may call for a Tv of 1/250 to 1/500 (e.g. with leaf shutter lenses), but otherwise ... — ?

    Re this:

    "Yes, there are various ways of overcoming this limitation on a brightly lit situation like stopping down or using a filter etc. but this might compromise image quality which voids the whole point of having a MF camera IMO."
    Very high quality glass ND filters exist that do not compromise image quality (unless you deliberately invoke flare), but resin filters can impinge upon aspherical/apochromatic lenses and should be avoided in those circumstances. Consider matching the quality of the filter to the quality of the lens.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #19

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    I use an SLR, 35mm, and the top shutter speed is 1/2000. I think in about 3 years I have used 1/1000 about 4 or 5 times, when I find myself to have ISO 400 film and f1.8 on a sunny day for special effects. Now, it is true I live in Finland and the sunlight at such high latitude might not be as strong (I doubt it´s a very big difference, I still use sunny f-16 rule and I get good exposures), but I still cannot imagine needing higher speeds. Of course ISO 3200 film can be a creative tool to use in daylight if one likes the grain, but isn´t it meant to be used in available light situation in first place? I don´t even own an ND filter. Do you guys in the south have so strong sun? I must confess I envy you a little bit...

  10. #20
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    1/400th does provide real limits for me, it has to do with subject speed.

    If the subject is fast like someone running or bicycling for example, their legs and arms may show significant blur.

    For me it also means that I if I want a large aperture I need to pick the film properly or be comfortable with a lower EI on the film in the camera, which in many cases is just fine.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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