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  1. #31
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nateo200 View Post
    That explains allot. I would have been really upset if Velvia 100 was discontinued, transparency film is starting to become a unicorn lately.

    I knew Velvia 100F was discontinued it was just strange that I grabbed one roll of it and seconds later it all disappears :O Allot of people didn't really like Velvia 100F but I actually thought the colors were excellent, I saw some shots of the night sky with V100F and thought it rendered out much better than Provia and the other Velvia's (there was a comparison). Velvia 50 is allot a bit too intense for certain things and on 135 with 36 exposures thats allot of shots to waste just to throw in some milder...Also pretty sure Velvia 50 sheet film has been discontinued, there was an article about some guy buying the last batch from Fuji, of course its still on the shelves but not for long, personally I find Velvia 100 to be the sweet spot. Provia is good too, I just wish they still made Provia 400X :/ Actually I wish they still made Ektachrome 200, just to have a nice normal decent speed slide film.

    Back to the topic though, Ektar 100 is great and if I didn't mention it before it scans like a boss, I haven't had any drum scans of Ektar 100 yet but I would imagine you could drum scan Ektar 100 negs of any size really and be able to go pretty big. Its one of those films where I see the limits of optics before the limits of the film if I stop down and take a super sharp shot. Someone even said it was like "digital in a roll of film" haha.
    Nope, Velvia50 is just only available to the Japanese market...
    That guy with the fridge was just being cautious since who knows if the Japanese market can solely sustain it...
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  2. #32

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    Since this is going to be a medium format shoot anyway, there's no reason really to split hairs over fineness of the film resolution. It's not going
    to hold detail suitable for close scrutiny under any circumstances. It would make far more sense to pick the film based upon the lighting and
    color characteristics of the scene itself, or perhaps on how well it scans. At this kind of enlargement, in this respect, nobody will know or care whether its Velvia or Ektar or Portra, whatever.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Since this is going to be a medium format shoot anyway, there's no reason really to split hairs over fineness of the film resolution. It's not going
    to hold detail suitable for close scrutiny under any circumstances. It would make far more sense to pick the film based upon the lighting and
    color characteristics of the scene itself, or perhaps on how well it scans. At this kind of enlargement, in this respect, nobody will know or care whether its Velvia or Ektar or Portra, whatever.
    Yeah but it doesn't hurt to be picky But I'm inclined to agree Velvia, Ektar, or Portra 160 would all do an excellent job, just depends on what he's shooting now, Portra for people makes a hell of allot more sense than say Velvia 50 :O Unless your a dermatologist of course Portra is pretty much designed for scanning and if you needed to make some adjustments to the contrast, colors, etc. IMO Portra has a much more neutral profile to start with...of course if everything is going to be optical/photochemical then I suppose have a film that gives you the colors and contrast off the bat would be better. I'd recommend Astia 100F but they don't make it anymore.... *Sigh*

  4. #34

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    As far as I'm concerned, Astia died when Cibachrome died; and Ciba died when Astia did. Side by side graves. Them was the good ole days.

  5. #35
    razocaine_07's Avatar
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    Sorry for not replying to all the messages though I appreciate all of the input. The images ended being drum scanned and printed 8ft square made up of 2 x 8x4ft panels on 5mm foamex, and the others were 1metre square. The image quality was amazing considering the enlargement size, and as mentioned, your not going to get complete sharpness as compared with LF prints. The budget which I was payed to produce the work was not going to allow for LF, even on a shoestring. The commissioners had a seperate pot of money to cover the printing costs.
    I bracketed between 100ISO and 80ISO and noted improved saturation qualities, especially in the blue tones when exposing for the later.

  6. #36
    polyglot's Avatar
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    but, er, which film did you use? Ektar?

  7. #37
    razocaine_07's Avatar
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    Yes Ektar ISO100

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