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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    As others indicated it is a film/spool flange issue.
    yes those posts were made as I was typing my reply but I do agree with them that the most likely cause is the film not being rolled super tightly onto the take up spool in the camera (and then being handled in bright-ish light). Turning your back in bright sunlight is still going to expose the film to more light than is recommended.

  2. #22

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    This certainly looks like light leaks around the spool flange. The older folders were not always good at keeping tension on the take-up spool. After unloading the spool you should try tensioning the paper before taping the spool. I also keep the films in a dark container after unloading.

    The films can be differently affected as they can wind with different tensions (e.g. due to different backing paper thickness or drag) and also while the spool and paper width should be standardised, I have had issues when changing brands of film with some combinations having gaps between paper and spool, and others where the paper is wider than the spool flange spacing.

  3. #23
    AgX
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    Yes, it has been reported here before thát there are suboptimum film/spool combos, when not usung the original combo.

  4. #24
    ziyanglai
    Ok so I have shot another roll loaded indoors and had it professionally developed. Still light leaks on the top and bottom edges. So it seems like it's a film spool issue. Is there anything that I can do about this? Sometimes it does cuts into the frame a little bit, but the light leaks are just annoying to me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #25
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Light leaks on B&W but not color film

    Quote Originally Posted by ziyanglai View Post
    Ok so I have shot another roll loaded indoors and had it professionally developed. Still light leaks on the top and bottom edges. So it seems like it's a film spool issue. Is there anything that I can do about this? Sometimes it does cuts into the frame a little bit, but the light leaks are just annoying to me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Spools tend to be SLIGHTLY different distance apart from manufacture to manufacturer, if you shoot some kodak, and follow it with ilford, the take up spool will have a different width than the original, couple this with not shielding the roll from the sun, and you'll get some light leak at the edges.

    I think the problem is how carefully you are shielding the film once it is shot. Which seems not very well, considering how much leak there is. There's a reason the spools say they should only be loaded and unloaded in subdued light.



    Last edited by StoneNYC; 06-04-2014 at 10:04 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #26
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Check to make sure the camera back is closing tightly, and stays tight(no movement at all), and make sure when you open a fresh roll of film that it is tight as possible to start with. It could be some of the rolls you have may be loose already, or you are allowing them to loosen when loading.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  7. #27
    MattKing's Avatar
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    You can tighten the film and backing paper on the spool and fold under the backing paper tongue before you remove the spool from the camera.

    I spin the spool with my fingers and use my thumbs to provide tension.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #28
    AgX
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    "...and fold under the backing paper tongue before you remove the spool"


    What do you mean by this?

  9. #29

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    For what it's worth, I've had similar problems with light leaks on Ilford FP4+ and HP5+ 120 film. Unless the films are changed out in very subdued lighting, the edges of the negatives darken up from light leakage exactly the way your pictures show. However, I've never had a problem with Fuji or Kodak E6 films experiencing light leakage like that when I've changed them out under the same lighting conditions.

    I went through a lengthy troubleshooting process for exactly the same reason about two years ago to try and determine if the problem was because of the camera or a bad film back and ended up coming to the conclusion that the Ilford film's backing paper must not be as tight up against the edges of the reels as Fuji's or Kodak's. It must be allowing just enough light through to expose the edges when you're stuck with changing films out under fairly bright light. When I'm able to avoid doing that, the negatives are fine but it isn't always possible. The fact it was kind of an intermittent problem because I was sometimes able to change films in very subdued light and sometimes not certainly made figuring this one out more difficult...

  10. #30
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    "...and fold under the backing paper tongue before you remove the spool"


    What do you mean by this?
    Boy, is this harder to explain then to show!

    When I get to the end of the film, the backing paper tongue and the adhesive coated "Exposed" strip are both loose at the end. If you don't somehow make that tongue shorter, the "Exposed" strip won't seal in a way that will reliably hold the backing paper tight on the spool. So you need to either cut off the tongue or, preferably, fold it under so that the end of the backing paper is a straight line, and the "Exposed" strip can make a good stick-on seal.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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