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  1. #21
    MattKing's Avatar
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    If you are trying to experiment with ultra-long exposures, reciprocity failure can be your friend.

    If your film requires three stops more exposure time due to reciprocity failure, you will need three stops less ND filter in order to use that exposure time.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bibowj View Post
    SO what everyone is saying is that I can't (or shouldn't) use a DSLR and its histogram to get a middle exposure as a 'starting point' to then bracket and ensure that I have all the detail in both highlights and shadows?
    The other thing I was trying to get across in post 12 was that your current negative may not be underexposed. The problem may be the scan or the post processing.

    It is outside the scope of APUG to get into the details of how, but for a moment forget the rest of the photo, try to scan and print just to get the shadows the way you want.

    If you can get the detail and contrast you want in the shadows (regardless of what the rest of the "print" looks like at this point) the negative is not underexposed.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #23

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    I've had good results so far using a canon g10 to spot meter. It's also useful for previewing the effect of coloured filters on black and white.
    What H/W and S/W are you using to scan. I find if I do a linear scan of a neg I always need to adjust the apparent exposure afterwards in PP.

  4. #24

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    My experience with DLSR exposures is that they are not very reliable in difficult light situations. The software seems to try to guess (wrong) about how to "correct" the image.

    If you really want to gauge the correct exposure in low light get an OM-2 or OM-4/4T. Olympus pioneered the OTF (Off the Film) exposure system and it is still phenomenal. I have made many nighttime exposures from several seconds to several minutes and they always come out beautiful, and that's on slide film!

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