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Thread: Film?

  1. #51
    analoguey's Avatar
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    Well, seems like an easy solution then - dump that lens/ have it repaired. Not the Camera or Tripod.
    Try the others without mirror up?

    Sent from Tap-a-talk

  2. #52
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by analoguey View Post
    Really? I have taken both street and cat photos at lower than 1/30, one to test the Floating lens element bit.
    I dont have a scanner myself, will see if I can contact print n post a digital of it?
    (I'll also just check my notes to see which ones)
    [edit - missed that you asked for a hi-res. File size is limited on here, I'll have to scan off an Epson v600, and post it -would that be close to what youre looking for?]
    Do you hold at waist level? If you shoot handheld? And is your tripod a good, strong one?



    Hehehe.
    I meant 1/8, should've said >= 1/4.
    I'll try and get a scan up :-)


    Sent from Tap-a-talk
    If you're shooting with a floating lens, that means you're probably shooting with a wide angle. So movements are less prone to be noticed and you can shoot at slower speeds. That won't work with longer lenses. When I print 16x20", there's no movement, something you ought to consider that you might do later on as well. Then you will notice the movement that you won't see on smaller prints.



    My experience has supported the view that others suggested to me - if you want consistently sharp images, and you are shooting landscapes often at slow speeds because you stopped down for greater DOF, it's still best to get in the habit of using a tripod, and using a cable release with mirror up. Another advantage is you can use slower, better film because you won't be constrained shooting at 1/2 sec , 1 sec or even longer during "magic hour" when the lighting is pretty dark. I believe I shot this at 1/2 or 1 second with 90mm lens on a RB67. The sun was starting to go down. Of course on a tripod, mirror up and a cable release.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/alankl...0/11854936794/

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonasfj View Post
    Hi,



    My thought process right now is that I should go for slower film. If I want the grainy look of Tri-X developed in Rodinal, I might as well continue shooting 135-film.

    I'm thinking TMax 100, Ektar and Fuji Pro 400H.

    Please share your experience and thoughts!

    Groet,

    Jonss

    My own experience using mainly TLR's, is that it is not just a matter of grain advantage when using 120 size film over 35mm. I find there is what I can only describe as a certain "roundness" and certainly an extra degree of subtlety when using 120 film in my Rollei It really doesn't matter what film you use. I regularly use HP5, Ektar & Portra.

  4. #54
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rolleiman View Post
    ... a certain "roundness" and certainly an extra degree of subtlety when using 120 film in my Rollei It really doesn't matter what film you use ...
    Is it because of using the 120 film or is it because of using the Rollei (that happens to use 120 film)? I guess the latter.
    I think that the lens has a greater impact than the use of 135 or 120 film. Especially if you don't make big enlargements.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
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    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Mamiya C330f, Nikon S2, Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T, Nikon F4s, Olympus Pen FT, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras.

  5. #55
    analoguey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    If you're shooting with a floating lens, that means you're probably shooting with a wide angle. So movements are less prone to be noticed and you can shoot at slower speeds.
    No, I was shooting with a regular 90mm KL. Even my 180 has a floating element too. Afaik all KLs do.
    And re wide angle, the 90mm is more or less standard lens, so...


    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    That won't work with longer lenses. When I print 16x20", there's no movement, something you ought to consider that you might do later on as well. Then you will notice the movement that you won't see on smaller prints.
    I would like to print it at that size, havent yet. My info was from seeing scans on a 20" monitor. Epson v600 ones.
    I am still setting up for an enlarger, will definitely try printing that size (and larger).


    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    My experience has supported the view that others suggested to me - if you want consistently sharp images, and you are shooting landscapes often at slow speeds because you stopped down for greater DOF, it's still best to get in the habit of using a tripod, and using a cable release with mirror up. Another advantage is you can use slower, better film because you won't be constrained shooting at 1/2 sec , 1 sec or even longer during "magic hour" when the lighting is pretty dark. I believe I shot this at 1/2 or 1 second with 90mm lens on a RB67. The sun was starting to go down. Of course on a tripod, mirror up and a cable release.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/alankl...0/11854936794/
    Thats a very snowy picture - how was the lake not covered with ice?

    I don't really shoot much landscapes, but thanks for the tip. I do usually shoot lower speed or medium speed film.

    Sent from Tap-a-talk

  6. #56
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by analoguey View Post
    Thats a very snowy picture - how was the lake not covered with ice?
    We get that overhere in Holland too. Ait temperature just below freezing, but the water itself is still "warm". Thus the snow remains (for a while) on the grass, but no ice on the water for several weeks (if at all).
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Mamiya C330f, Nikon S2, Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T, Nikon F4s, Olympus Pen FT, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras.

  7. #57
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by analoguey View Post
    No, I was shooting with a regular 90mm KL. Even my 180 has a floating element too. Afaik all KLs do.
    And re wide angle, the 90mm is more or less standard lens, so...
    My 180mm K/L lens doesn't have a floating element - just a rotatable depth of field ring.

    I believe just the 65mm, 75mm, 90mm and 140mm lenses have the floating element. See here for a good compilation of information (click on lenses and accessories): http://www.mamiyaleaf.com/legacy_RB67.asp
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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