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Thread: Film?

  1. #1

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    Film?

    Hi,

    I'm a reasonably experienced 35mm shooter who just recently acquired a beautiful Hasselblad camera with a normal and a wide angle lens.

    My question to you guys is which film you use and why?

    My thought process right now is that I should go for slower film. If I want the grainy look of Tri-X developed in Rodinal, I might as well continue shooting 135-film.

    I'm thinking TMax 100, Ektar and Fuji Pro 400H.

    Please share your experience and thoughts!

    Groet,

    Jonss

  2. #2
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Fuji PRO 400H is an excellent film. I don't use Ektar so can't comment on that film. I saw very nice images lately from Kodak Portra 160 (street photography) so I got me some myself to try soon.

    For B&W you could also try Ilford FP4+ (@100 ASA) and Ilford HP5+ (@400 ASA), a very reliable film.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Nikon S2, Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T, Nikon F4s, Olympus Pen FT, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras.

  3. #3

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    I shoot mostly Tri-X, but sometimes FP4 and TMax 100, and I mostly use Rodinal 50 to 1. I sometime like just a bit of grain in my 6x6 photos, even Tri-X is not bad. Like you, when I want I want grain, I shoot 35mm. Some of my photos here represent these combinations.

  4. #4
    aRolleiBrujo's Avatar
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    Use any and use all, before it runs dry! Happy film photography! -Americo.R

  5. #5

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    Grainy? Tri-X in Rodinal coming at ya. 120 is quite different from 35mm, but if you meter and agitate right, 35mm is fine too. First shot is 120, second and third are 35mm. Fourth one is a screw up :] These were at 1:25 dilution by the way, which is all I ever do.

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  6. #6

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    We all have our favorite films. My suggestion is to shoot a little of everything and find what you like. You have a nice camera to shoot it with. A Hasselblad is a joy to use.

  7. #7
    polyglot's Avatar
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    use whatever you like the look of

    Personally I haven't been able to get TMX to work for me, but I've seen other people produce wonderful photos from it and there is nothing in current production with higher resolution unless you use document films (e.g. CMS20, Tech Pan) that are harder to get good continuous tone and dynamic range from. If you like TMX in 35mm, you will love it in 6x6.

    I love me some Acros (practically no reciprocity failure - great for night photos) and Pan-F. 400H is nice film; Portra 400 is different but nice in its own way and has less visible grain than 400H. Portra 160 is even nicer still. There are no finer colour films than Ektar, but it has Super Ultra Mega Colour (think Velvia in a negative) so isn't much good for portraits of anything but clowns. Give some TMY2 (Tmax 400) a try, you might be surprised how good a print you can make from it in medium format. I have several 16"-wide prints made from TMY2 in Xtol, shot at 800 and 1600; they're sharp and basically grain-free.

  8. #8
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    Medium format TMAX 400 is virtually grainless, even at 16x20. It's amazing.

    HP5 will have a touch o' grain at that size, but certainly not what you'd call "grainy." Anything smaller will be perfect.

    I think it's actually a bit of a project to make 120 look grainy, so just buy a bunch of something and get to work. If you like tripod shooting and/or tend to work in bright light, get 100 speed, but if you like to handhold and/or work in flatter light, don't be afraid of 400 speed. Probably easiest just to keep working with Tri-X if that's what you are already shooting in 35mm.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  9. #9
    eddie's Avatar
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    The first thing you should shoot is whatever film/developer combo you use in 35mm. It's really the only way to get a baseline comparison, so you can see what the format change does for you, without introducing other variables.

  10. #10
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    The first thing you should shoot is whatever film/developer combo you use in 35mm. It's really the only way to get a baseline comparison, so you can see what the format change does for you, without introducing other variables.
    +1
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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