Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,806   Posts: 1,581,399   Online: 1094
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: 4x5 vs 6x7 crop

  1. #21
    michaelbsc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,106
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Old-N-Feeble View Post
    ... I prefer narrower ratios

    [...]

    there's no reason to not crop unless the subject fits the format perfectly.
    With all the talk of ratios, I suspect the average consumer would "prefer" the Golden Ratio - just google for more than you care to know. But that's not the size of any commercial product.

    As far as cropping goes, I have often marveled at the prices a 6x12 back for a 4x5 will fetch. I've said on many occasions that there is a perfectly good 6x12 image inside every 4x5 image you take.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    OK, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    340
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Linhof introduced the phrase "ideal format" in the late 1950s. The attraction was that it not only printed to 8x10" approximately, but also suited vertical magazine formats of the day. Linhof 6x7 backs are actually 56x72mm.

    I'd say it's the rollfilm format I most often shoot, but 6x9 has its attractions (same proportions as the 35mm frame), as do all the others.
    Interesting. If memory serves, I believe it was an engineer at Linhof that coined the term "Large Format" when describing the 6x9 as being the threshold between smaller formats and what was soon to be known as Large Format. Subsequently Linhof used the term when advertising their new cameras in photography magazines. I believe that occurred around '51 or '52. I don't recall ever seeing the term used "in print" prior to that time frame. But, prior to that I do believe it would have been seen as a identification marking (stenciled) on aerial-film crates during WWII. And then . . . I could be making this all up.
    Entre La Espada y La Pared.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Alamo City, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,859
    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    With all the talk of ratios, I suspect the average consumer would "prefer" the Golden Ratio - just google for more than you care to know. But that's not the size of any commercial product.

    As far as cropping goes, I have often marveled at the prices a 6x12 back for a 4x5 will fetch. I've said on many occasions that there is a perfectly good 6x12 image inside every 4x5 image you take.
    True but roll film has the edge on two counts: 1) It has slightly better resolution than sheet film., 2. One RFH and a few rolls of film are easier to carry around and use than DDS and a change tent.

    In the one hand one could argue that more than one RFH is needed to allow for shooting different types/speeds of film and/or allow variable processing times/techniques for B&W. So this negates the compactness issue. On the other hand and IMO, if an image is worth taking at all then it's worth taking six... use up the whole roll. Lighting can change slightly... one could bracket for DOF or shutter speed... and this gives extra copies in case one or more frames are damaged.

    I'm not suggesting 6x12cm is preferable to cropped 4x5. I'm just saying that's my choice.
    Last edited by Old-N-Feeble; 08-18-2014 at 12:51 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling

  4. #24
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,378
    I am not exactly clear on how I should be cropping

    Why are you cropping?

  5. #25
    LMNOP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Vermont
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Why are you cropping?

    I've addressed this already. Not cropping the image other than cleaning up the negative by getting rid of the black edges from scanning.

  6. #26
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,191
    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i guess now i can ask it

    not to cause trouble, but why crop at all ?
    when you compose the image, do you use the whole view if so
    why crop out part of what you composed to be part of the image?
    you suggest you are stingy about maximizing your negative, doesn't cropping it
    defeat the whole purpose ?

    whenever i use a 2x3 back i usually compose full frame and don't crop, that rectangle
    always looks nice on 5x7 and 8x10 with a border ......
    There was a big thread on this before but bottom line (heck, I think you were in it, stirring things up?) is that some folks do and some don't. Me, sometimes I do and sometimes I don't. The world, and the compositions I spot or decide to create, don't always come in per-arranged aspect ratios corresponding to the camera I happen to be using. When un-cropped frames work for my composition, I don't crop. When composition needs cropping IMHO then I happily do so. I'd say about 1/3 of my 6x6 negatives are cropped to rectangles, for example, while the rest are printed square.

    YMMV. Do what works for you and makes sense to you.

  7. #27
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,378
    Quote Originally Posted by LMNOP View Post
    I've addressed this already. Not cropping the image other than cleaning up the negative by getting rid of the black edges from scanning.
    Sorry I have no idea what that is, ill just ignore this thread...

  8. #28
    LMNOP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Vermont
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    There was a big thread on this before but bottom line (heck, I think you were in it, stirring things up?) is that some folks do and some don't. Me, sometimes I do and sometimes I don't. The world, and the compositions I spot or decide to create, don't always come in per-arranged aspect ratios corresponding to the camera I happen to be using. When un-cropped frames work for my composition, I don't crop. When composition needs cropping IMHO then I happily do so. I'd say about 1/3 of my 6x6 negatives are cropped to rectangles, for example, while the rest are printed square.

    YMMV. Do what works for you and makes sense to you.
    I completely agree. And I may have used the wrong term, because everyone is asking me why crop at all? I don't know how much more clear I can be, but when I scan negatives, there is a black frame surrounding the exposure, you know, where the exposed section ends. I am simply getting rid of that with a preset ratio. I think everyone does this, not sure if that qualifies as cropping, but my goal is to maintain all of the negative when possible.

  9. #29
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,918
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by LMNOP View Post
    I completely agree. And I may have used the wrong term, because everyone is asking me why crop at all? I don't know how much more clear I can be, but when I scan negatives, there is a black frame surrounding the exposure, you know, where the exposed section ends. I am simply getting rid of that with a preset ratio. I think everyone does this, not sure if that qualifies as cropping, but my goal is to maintain all of the negative when possible.
    It is the "preset ratio" part that is confusing us.

    Why do you feel constrained to using a preset ratio? Why not just manually crop to the edges of the imaged area?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Alamo City, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,859
    ^^^ Right... why not keep the full-size full-resolution image and only crop/resize when ready to print.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin