Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,957   Posts: 1,586,054   Online: 820
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11
    alienmeatsack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Oklahoma, USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    168
    momus, I think they do a fine job and I've used them on nicer cameras with nicer lenses and you couldn't tell it was a cheap plastic CUL.

    The put that attaches to the Holga's lens w the notches is plastic (it's all plastic) so it's very easy to file/cut notches and flip them to rubber band them to the TLR body as I said above.

    I also took it a step further and wrote the focus distance in inches on each one of mine for easy reference. I also have a piece of string w knots tied on it that I can use to get my focus distance right that i keep with the holga when I use them w it.

    For $20 USD for the 2 sets, you can't go wrong IMHO.

    Look forward to seeing what you do with them! (Assuming you post results)

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Superior, Colorado USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    210
    I was just thinking - wouldn't single (as opposed to pairs of) lenses actually be sufficient? After focusing and correcting for parallax, you just have to move the closup lens from the viewing lens to the taking lens before capturing the image. Granted, that could be slightly awkward if your lens is rubber-band mounted; but not really any more so than having TWO rubber band mounted attachments. Anyway, if you decide you really like the camera and might want to try other types of filters with it, the series filter approach is worth considering.

    Jeff

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Superior, Colorado USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    210
    I often use a "stick" version of your string trick with my Portra +2 and +3 closeup lenses. It consistes of two separate wooden dowels cut to the correct lengths. The one stick is 1/3 m long and is used by itself with the +3 filter, while the shorter (1/6m long) stick is only used in combination with the other one to get the combined 1/2m length needed for the +2 filter. The quick connect/disconnect feature is accomplished via a short section of tubing glued to the end of the shorter stick, and allows the pair to fit in a modest sized camera bag. As rigid sticks, they are convenient in that only one hand is needed to hold the stick while setting up he camera.

    Here's a picture.

    Quote Originally Posted by alienmeatsack View Post
    momus, I think they do a fine job and I've used them on nicer cameras with nicer lenses and you couldn't tell it was a cheap plastic CUL.

    The put that attaches to the Holga's lens w the notches is plastic (it's all plastic) so it's very easy to file/cut notches and flip them to rubber band them to the TLR body as I said above.

    I also took it a step further and wrote the focus distance in inches on each one of mine for easy reference. I also have a piece of string w knots tied on it that I can use to get my focus distance right that i keep with the holga when I use them w it.

    For $20 USD for the 2 sets, you can't go wrong IMHO.

    Look forward to seeing what you do with them! (Assuming you post results)

  4. #14
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,196
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Denverdad View Post
    I often use a "stick" version of your string trick with my Portra +2 and +3 closeup lenses. It consistes of two separate wooden dowels cut to the correct lengths. The one stick is 1/3 m long and is used by itself with the +3 filter, while the shorter (1/6m long) stick is only used in combination with the other one to get the combined 1/2m length needed for the +2 filter. The quick connect/disconnect feature is accomplished via a short section of tubing glued to the end of the shorter stick, and allows the pair to fit in a modest sized camera bag. As rigid sticks, they are convenient in that only one hand is needed to hold the stick while setting up he camera.

    Here's a picture.
    Thanks, this is a good idea.
    Dan

    The simplest tools can be the hardest to master.

  5. #15
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,396
    You can use any close up lens, just hold it over the taking lens. Focus first by holding it over the viewing lens and moving the tripod back and forth. You can then use your tripod column to lift the camera up a few inches after focusing to remove parallax error of the viewing lens.

  6. #16
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,228
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    A Mamiya C series camera allows close-up work without any accessories. At maximum bellows extension the subject coverage with an 80mm lens is 8.6x8.6 cm.

    If you have a C330 there is an exposure compensation aid and parallax correction guide built into the viewing system. A paramender accessory helps with composing.
    In addition to Matt's comments, with the Mamiya C330 series with the 55mm wide angle lens pair fitted you can get 1:1 life size reproduction without any accessories.
    Ben

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montgomery, Il/USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,313
    The limitation of the TLR may be having to shoot straight on to the subject.
    If you shoot at an upward or downward angle adjusting for parallax can be exciting when you have to compensate for both upward and forward movement.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  8. #18
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,228
    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    The limitation of the TLR may be having to shoot straight on to the subject.
    If you shoot at an upward or downward angle adjusting for parallax can be exciting when you have to compensate for both upward and forward movement.
    That's true John, but the Mamiya paramender moves the taking lens up 50mm the distance between all the Mamiya C lenses into the exact position of the viewing lens so there is no parallax error .
    Ben

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Crossville, Tn
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    52
    I think the viewing close up lens has to be aligned properly. There may be a red dot or something that has to face up. If you find close up lenses, you may need to find instructions to use them. Unless you are like me who doesn't read instructions or doesn't ask for directions.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin