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  1. #1
    Digidurst's Avatar
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    A good but simple light meter - suggestions?

    Hi everyone! I have just obtained a Mamiya 330f (what a beauty!) and I also have an old Graflex 22 (that my son has taken an interest in) as well as a few very old 35mm's that I like to shoot with.
    So, I'm looking for a good but simple and cheap ambient light meter that I can I use with my old cameras and I'd like to teach my 8 yr. old son to use it too. Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    BradS's Avatar
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    Gossen Luna Pro Digital.

  3. #3
    Digidurst's Avatar
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    Hmmm... I was thinking that maybe an analog one would be easier for the kiddo to deal with.

  4. #4
    MenacingTourist's Avatar
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    For my general light meter needs (mainly in the studio) I use a Polaris. Got it cheap on eBay and has performed will metering for my Mamiya RB67.

    Good luck

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    I can add recommendation for the Polaris, plus it can be made into a semi-spot with a $50 attachment. That said there is nothing as simple or cheap as a good old gossen luna pilot. No batteries, no fuss just point it and take a reading..and it should be found under$50 - though I haven't priced one in years. It was the first meter I owned, still have it and it is nice and small.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  6. #6
    Digidurst's Avatar
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    Mike, that sounds like just what I need - thanks!

  7. #7
    papagene's Avatar
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    A Gossen Scout II is also a light, cheap with no batteries light meter. I paid $40.00 for mine years ago. And it still works fine (as a back up to my Luna Pro F).
    You might be able to find a Scout used on ebay.
    Good luck.

    gene
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
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    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  8. #8
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    I'll second the prior motions on the Gossen stuff.

    I picked up a Lunasix last summer (less than $30.00 on ebay). Its my first light meter, so I wanted to keep it simple. I love the thing!
    I had never used one nor seen one used and it didn't come with directions.

    So, what did I do? I asked someone here and quickly got some great tips and a website referral.That website had the entire instruction manual posted. Bingo and Parchese, I was in business...

    I wish I had been introduced to decent cameras when I was younger, instead of cranking out terribly exposed vignetted instamatic junk.

    Good luck and remember to have lots of fun teaching and shooting with your son.

  9. #9
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I would avoid the meters without batteries. I have a Gossen Scout 3 and it is not at all accurate or consistent except in full daylight. Don't saddle him with a meter that doesn't meter well. I am in favor of no batteries, but not at the expense of accuracy.

  10. #10
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    I have a Gossen Sixtomat selenium meter that was old when I got it, with a camera purchase, not quite 35 years ago. It's still easily within 1/2 stop, and will meter well in light conditions down about f/2.8 @ 1/30 on EI 400 (though, being older, it doesn't have EI settings higher than 400 -- not a huge handicap, since it's easy to set it one or two stops lower than the film speed and compensate, if necessary). Yes, a silicon blue cell will meter in lower light, probably 4-5 stops lower. No, I don't often shoot in light like that, and when I do, I can usually make do with an exposure guide (the CdS meter in my Spottie doesn't go more than a stop or so dimmer than the Sixtomat anyway).

    These days, if you can find one, a Sixtomat shouldn't set you back as much as $20. If it works at all, it should be accurate. It also has an incident cover, BTW.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

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