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  1. #11

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    The 135mm is probably the best portait lens in the TLR selection. Long enough for tight head shots without exaggerating features, and short enough for domestic spaces. It makes a useful two-lens pair with the 65mm for general photography.

    However, I find the 180mm is a better general purpose long lens. If portraits are your thing, go for the 135mm. If it is going to be too short for a lot of things, decide where you want to compromise (or get both).

    The 135mm has a quirk that disturbs some people - the shutter is mounted behind the optical elements, and the blades are exposed.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  2. #12
    Digidurst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighead
    I think 70 - 80 is ideal for 35mm, but an 80 for Medium Format is more like a 50 in 35mm.... So I've heard..
    I think you're right - my bad!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewH
    I had the 180 Super and loved it.
    Yes, I love this lens also. It really shines when doing portraits that you wish to have that candid look. It can be sharp as a razor, or pleasingly soft when backing off on the focus ever so slightly.

  4. #14
    Blighty's Avatar
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    I'd go for the 135mm f4.5. It's a good lens. Strangely enough (and typically Mamiya) the diaphragm is behind the lens elements, so careful when you handle one! BLIGHTY.

  5. #15

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    I've been shooting a lot with a 180 (chrome), and I like how the results, but for indoor work it does require a lot of room. On the other hand, i've been doing head-sized objects in a standard dining room (60's split-ranch), without feeling that I was had my back to the wall.

    The only other consideration would be what lens you already have. If you're doing the occasional portrait, and already have the 80, then the 180 gets you a little over x2 in focal length, which may be more important for when you want a long lens in other settings.

  6. #16
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    I use every lens made by Seikor for my Mamiya C330f and the 135 is definitely my choice for portraits. However, the 109, as stated above, is a fine lens too and does about as well - especially for outdoor stuff. Be aware though, the 135's shutter is not between the lens elements, it is exposed at the rear.
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  7. #17

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    Go for the 105 and don't back off so far. Good for head AND shoulders
    AND seated. With the faster lens AND working closer you'll have good
    depth of field control.
    Later close in with the 135. I used the 180 for seated, Outdoors. Dan

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by r-brian
    The DOF of 135mm @ f4.5 will be close to the DOF of 105mm @ f3.5.
    The DOF: you should have added, at the same subject to lens
    distance. BUT the 105mm will be used closer AND has the
    faster lens. We all know how depth of field disappears
    as the lens nears the subject. Dan

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by dr bob
    Be aware though, the 135's shutter is not between the lens elements, it is exposed at the rear.
    Meaning what? You need to take care when swapping them out??

    To answer the other question, I have the 80mm. I seem to be doing an abundant amount of portraits and will be doing some table tob stuff... Love how close you can get with these TLR's....

  10. #20
    dr bob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighead
    Meaning what? You need to take care when swapping them out??
    Yes, of course. Several individuals have expressed surprise at this design feature. It is rather unusual.

    [/QUOTE]To answer the other question, I have the 80mm. I seem to be doing an abundant amount of portraits and will be doing some table tob stuff... Love how close you can get with these TLR's....[/QUOTE]

    Your 80mm will focus to 35.4 cm from the film plane, the 105 58.4, and the 135 90.2mm. The 80mm is usually considered as equivalent to a 50 mm in 35mm work and will certainly produce a typical portrait if properly aligned to the subject. The 135mm lens will yield a portrait image with little perspective variations, that’s all
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

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