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  1. #1

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    Help Please with Voigtlander Perkeo 2

    After reading feedback on the above camera I took the risk, andbought myself one from ebay.

    Exposure seems fine on all speeds and stop numbers so okay here.

    Unfortunatley I seem to have light leaking in from belows. Not on all of the shots but on some. I have been advised that it must be a slight light leak because it has been intimated that the shots that have the light leak most probably have been taken after the bellows have been extended, left for a preiod of time then the picture taken. I cannot verify this at the moment.

    However, is it possible that light leakage from a bellow would not show up if I look through the back of the camera in complete darkness and then shine a torch all around the front part of the bellows.

    Could it be something else?

    It does appear that on the 2 rolls of film I have tested on the 1st frame is the worst.


    Any ideas help would surely be appriciated.



    Regards



    Darryl

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    To test the bellows, put the light inside the bellows and then look on the outside to see if you can find any pinhole leaks (or look around the room and see if you've got a "planetarium"), rather than the other way around. It's much easier that way.

    Bostick and Sullivan sell a bellows patch kit for pinhole leaks you can order from their website.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
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  3. #3
    Will S's Avatar
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    You might want to check out www.certo6.com for a CLA and a bellows replacement.

    Best,

    Will
    "I am an anarchist." - HCB
    "I wanna be anarchist." - JR

  4. #4
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Darryl,

    The light leak might show as worse on frames where you have the bellows folded out for longer times, have the film sitting in one spot longer, or are exposing the camera to brighter light while the film sits stationary for a longer time. If it's always the first frame, it might also be your loading technique, but that's hard to diagnose without seeing the film. Is it only in the picture area, or also on the edges of the film? Especially heavy edge fogging is usually loading problems, or perhaps a leak in the camera back seals. In the image area only is likely to be bellows leakage.

    I shot a roll with small pinholes in my Isolette bellows, but didn't see any fogging, as it was dim and overcast, and I was careful about advancing and closing the bellows. I'm sure I could have induced fogging by leaving the bellows open for long periods in bright sun.

    Jurgen Kreckel, certo6.com, could do a bellows replacement and lens and shutter CLA for you if you don't want to DIY. His prices are reasonable, and he'll give you an estimate by email. My Agfa Isolette I was about $100 for CLA and bellows replacement. Don't know if the Perkeo II would be the same, but it's a similar camera. He's in Pennsylvania. I was happy with his service on my camera, which was quickly and well done.

    Lee

    I'm a little late, and echoing the recommendation by Will S by the time I typed this. You gotta be fast on APUG.

  5. #5

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    To check the bellows on my folders (Mockva 2 &5), I bought a surface mount light socket and wired it to six feet of lamp cord. I use it with a 15 watt or smaller builb. To check the bellows, I set the socket down on a flat surface, open the back of the camera, and set it down so that the light is inside of the bellows. Do this in a dark room and any light leaks will be evident.

    You can fix pinholes with a mixture of wood glue (Elmer's or similar) and lamp black. I have also had good luck with black fabric paint. In either case, leave the camera open until the glue or paint dries.

  6. #6

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    Thank you all for your assistance


    David: I only had 2 choices. Thank you - I can now see 2 holes. I have looked at the website for the repair kit, and may choose to use.


    Will: Yeah I know of this guy, and his reputation seems to be excellent. I am based in the UK so would most pobably have to conceed that it would not be a viable repair for the camera I bought. (The camera cost me $140).

    Lee: Thanks for your info. All the fogging is always on the picture area. It does seem that there are 2 areas, hence 2 found holes. Yes I agree with your sentiment. Now I know the holes are there, I am sure it would be possible to eliminate fogging by keeping the bellows open for a minimum period of time. It's obviously not the way forward, but it certainly explains why some shots show fogging and some don't.

    Pschauss: Elmer's glue!!! If this is wood glue i trust it is white and dries translucent. Hence the addition of lamp black. I have also read a few drops of washing up liquid. Is it right that this needs to be applied to the inside of the bellows. I would prefer to work on the outside of the bellows.




    I have been told to use the black tubed stuff that comes in puncture repair kit. Now its been a long long time since I've repaired a bicylcle tyre. I remember that the patch was stuck onto the tyre using a tubed glue. But I thought it was clear in colour. Can anyone confirm if this glue should/could be used. I am assuming that if it is clear I could add lamp black to turn it black.


    Thanks in advance



    Darryl

  7. #7
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Darryl,

    If you want to replace rather than repair the bellows yourself, camerabellows.com in the UK can sell you something to fit. I don't recall if they post prices on their web site. They used to produce camera bellows by the million for Kodak and others.

    Lee

  8. #8

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    Correct. You apply the Elmer's glue + lamp black to the inside.

  9. #9

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    Elmer's Glue

    I have to make this comment.

    If Elmer's glue is regular wood glue then it dries and becomes very brittle. I cannot see how that would be what one would be looking for, because the opening and closing of the bellows will eventually cause a crack.

    I have used Evo stick mixed with black Hammorite. I made it into a paste put it on an envelope and allowed it to dry. I was then able to roll the envelope and the glue was quite flexable. I have used 3 light coats and have certainly sealed the holes for the time being. I have applied this to the outside of the bellows.

    I just can't see how ELmer's (if it is normal wood glue) can do the job on a long term basis. I must point out I have never tried this before and I am prepared to be shot down in flames with my evo stick choice.

  10. #10

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    You can also use artists acrylic(black) from the local art supply house. Apply a thin coat(or more) with a toothpick and smooth it out. Allow to dry thoroughly before closing the bellows. It remains flexible & is opaque. A small tube is many lifetimes supply.

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