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  1. #1

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    Yashicamat 124 - Is this lens flare? Anything I can do?


    Notice the light coming through the window seems to create a fog of light in front of the background column and stuff. Is that lens flare or is it just bad lens haze? I have read about flocking the insides of these cameras and wonder if that would help or if it is a lens problem cause by coating damage. I have cleaned the front and back of both front and rear elements and the glass looks glossy on the front the flashlight test shows a bit of haze and some spots from the oil that sat on the glass for so long are visible when holding the element up to the light by itself.

    Everything on the camera is in good shape and photos without strong light look great.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 15-7-006.jpg  
    "If its not broken, I can't afford it."

  2. #2
    APUGuser19's Avatar
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    The best way I know of seeing defects, haze, specks, etc., is to inspect the lens with help of a 60w lightbulb in an ordinary table lamp and shade. The idea is to hold the shutter open while continually turning the camera different angles to whatever point it takes to be able to see the surfaces of the glass, and not simply looking through them. I'm not sure I have the vocabulary to express this more understandably. The gist of it is, you need to see the surface of the glass while looking through it, not thru the glass at something beyond it.
    As for your photo, it's flare. Probably exacerbated by dirty glass or coating destruction. More unclean glass than anything. As for the Yashinon lens, it has a long document history of a tendency to flare when it was brand new and factory clean.

    If the glass were clean and perfect, I doubt the flare need have been this pronounced, but there still would have been some.

  3. #3
    zanxion72's Avatar
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    Unfortunately Yashinons are very prone to flare. The coatings of these lenses cannot do much about that. All one could do is use a hood and avoid such intense light sources in their frames.
    My Yashica Mat-124G has perfectly clean optics and in cases like this it flares quite a bit. And that flare has that hazy look.

  4. #4
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    It's not so much the lens as the inside of the rather poorly flocked camera. You can flock the camera much better than a stock camera. You can always use a hood (a plastic bayonet fitting hood is a few bucks off eBay). And you can use it creatively, intentionally or accidentally:

    The Light of Music by Roger Cole, on Flickrkrr

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I agree with Roger, it's not particularly the lens it's the internal paintwork. I've noticed that some matt black paint seems to get lighter with time & aging I don't have my Yashicamat here (it's in Turkey) to check it. I have had some flare with mine once or twice on over-cast days when the sky is beginning to brighten up in front of me.

    There's a huge exposure difference in the OP's image between the interior scene and the light coming through the window and that's causing internal reflections inside the camera this will amplify any flare from the lens itself.

    In general I don't find the Yashinon lens itself prone to flare, I keep a Plastic lens hood on the taking lens and use the camera in very bright daylight often shooting almost into the sun with no issues. It's the relationship between the overall exposure and the excessive brightness of the light coming through the window, or in my case a bright sky while I was in a shaded area (moat of Rhodos around the city wall).

    With many cameras I restore I usually repaint the interiors and the matt black paint I use is very noticeably darker and less reflective than the original paint. That must make a very significant difference.

    Ian

  6. #6
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    It's not an urban myth, it just doesn't happen that often, depending on the subject and light. See both examples above. The vast majority of my shots show no such flare either, with enough SBR into the light you can get it. It's also possible, as Ian says, that the black paint fades and becomes less dark with time so cameras that didn't use to exhibit this might by now.

  7. #7

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    My Yashicamat 124G has a similar problem and I can see that it is caused by fogging of the rear element of the taking lens.

    I had the camera serviced just over 6 years ago including clean lenses. The problem reoccurred within 4 years. Internet folklore says that it is out gassing of
    lubricants from the shutter. It is very obvious when the shutter is locked on B and attempting to view through the taking lens from the rear.

    I will be putting the camera in for the lens to be cleaned again fairly soon but I don't know if I'll keep it much longer after it is cleaned. I'll see what the
    camera tech guy has to say about it.

  8. #8
    Chrismat's Avatar
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    Flocking the inside of a Yashicamat makes a difference. My first Yashica was a Yashica 24 that I purchased a few years ago, and I was getting flare similar to your example even when I was using a lens shade. Then I saw this online: http://www.usedcameradb.com/blog/201...shica-mat-124/, and it made a major difference.
    Last edited by Chrismat; 03-04-2015 at 05:53 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    In the 7 or 8 years I've had my Yashicamat flare has only been an issue with one image I've printed, I think one frame taken at the same time/place probably exhibts it as well.

    Paints do age, some considerably more than others, many of us can remember the paints used on cars (automobiles) going dull and chalky. I never heard anyone mentioning needing to repaint/flock the inside of Yashicamats until more recent years and as Snapguy says people were getting excellent results with them. So I do wonder if the paint's faded with time.

    Ian

  10. #10

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    I should have mentioned that I have and always use a lens hood. Another example:

    And an outdoor shot without flare, due to overcast:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 14-54-017e.jpg   14-54-002.jpg  
    "If its not broken, I can't afford it."

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