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  1. #31
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Sure, a Mamiya Press will have fewer alignment issues than a folder. But I can put any of my 6x9 folders (even the bulky Moskva-5) in a coat pocket -- and I challenge the Mamiya to make a negative distinguishable from those out of my 1928 Voigtlander Rollfilmkamera, barring flare from the uncoated lens or enlargments bigger than about 16x24 inches...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  2. #32
    Ole
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    Here's beauty - there are cheaper ones, but not many nicer! http://www.ritzcam.com/catalog/index...tegory_id=1130
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #33
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Ole, mine is the Rollfilmkamera model, the direct precedent to the Inos I. It's 6x9 only (Inos was 6x9/6x4.5 with double framing windows) and has simpler accents etc., but otherwise very similar; it has a 10.5 cm f/4.5 Skopar in rim-set Compur with unit focusing, pull-out front standard rather than the self-erecting type that started to show up in the late 1930s, and no body release -- but the waist level finder is clear, clean, and bright, so I can cradle the camera and release with a thumb, and hand hold dead steady about 90% of the time down to 1/25, and effectively 100% at 1/200. This was surely a very expensive camera in 1928. I've been tweaking and tuning it since I got it.

    What'd I give for it? I traded a lens and shutter. I got the combination of 105 mm Dominar Anastigmat and Press Prontor for $10, with the shutter jammed solid in the open position (based on how it was mounted, I think it had been used for enlarging), repaired and cleaned the shutter, and machined the mount into a retaining ring, then fabricated a lens board to fit a Baby Graphic. Since I have more time than money just now, it was a pretty good deal...

    I'd love to have a Bessa rangefinder, or the 6x9 Prominent (with Heliar, please), but until I find my gold mine, this Rollfilmkamera will do the job nicely...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  4. #34

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    I just recently sold a Mamiya Press 23. It is a great camera with great lenses, but they have to be one of the heaviest and bulkiest hand held cameras out there. I couldn't carry it on long walks. I have a Century Graphic that weighs much less and folds much more compact and will match the optical quality. It's my first camera of choice for serious work.
    I keep a Moskva 5 loaded for a grab camera. The pics I've taken with it look just as good as my heavier cameras, but I haven't made any big enlargements from it yet. Smaller prints look very sharp and contrasty. Moskva's do vary in quality, though. I had to buy two to make one good one, so be careful where you buy.
    I also have a Wirgin Auta that is even lighter and more compact than the Moskva 5. It has a 105mm f=4.5 Gewironar triplet lens with four shutter speeds (25, 50, 100, 125) plus B. Stopped down a stop or two it takes great pictures and is very sharp and contrasty. If this had a couple of slower shutter speeds and a 250 speed as well, it'd be my pocket camera of choice. In the meantime, the Moskva 5 does an excellent job.

    Oh yeah, I almost forgot. I have a Kodak Tourist II with an Anastar lens. This lens is as good as the Moskva 5 Industar lens. The camera origionally took 620 film, but can be modded to take 120. I did this this a couple of years ago (camera had an Anaston triplet on it then.) It takes a good afternoon's work and a dremel tool to convert, but works well when done.

    Dave

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