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  1. #11
    titrisol's Avatar
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    TLRs are not rangefinder, they are reflex cameras, you focus on the ground glass using the "Viewing" lens and shoot using the taker lens, hence TWIN lens.
    see HERE

    IIRC There are a couple of rangefinders (Mamiya 6 comes to mind) for sqaure format.....

    Quote Originally Posted by snaggs
    I really like the square format. Are they rangefinders? How do you focus?

    Daniel.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  2. #12
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    Well, I'm just not using my digital anymore, and tend to just use my F65 w/50mm. I've come too like the freedom from gear of just learning to use one lens, and concentrating on thinking.

    The results I've been getting from film just kill my digital for some reason, more better looking shots. So I was pretty settled on getting a 35mm rangefinder, small & compact, with just one lens (Rollei 35RF w/40mm Sonnar f/2.8).

    Now I've been reading about TLR's.. and they seem very similar, but quieter (leaf shutter), just as handholdable (for available light), square format (which I like). Just not sure about the size, think I'll pop into my local camera shop tommorow.

    Anyone got any TLR available light shots done using Delta 3200 or something high speed?

    Daniel.

    PS. It also seems that Rollei 6x6 projectors are not too expensive, I imagine a tranny from these looks pretty good ?

  3. #13
    B-3
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    I have a Yashica-D that is a joy to work with. As others have pointed out, it's light enough to use handheld. I also have a Mamiyaflex with interchangeable lenses, it's well-built but rather heavy, so I only use it on a tripod (which is less often).

    These sorts of cameras are often available used and shouldn't be too expensive. Just make sure you're getting a good lens, as many seem to come in versions with both desirable and less-desirable lenses - probably a pricing issue when they were first released.

    The negatives are things of beauty. Try it, you'll like it.

  4. #14

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    I have a Lubitell 166U and a Seagull that I put a ton of film through. The small size of the Lubi makes it really unobtrusive for streetshooting and the nice split screen focusing on the Seagull gives me wonderfully sharp negs, plus the Seagull has exquisite frame spacing and is a *solid* camera.

  5. #15

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    TLR

    I have a Rollie 2.8F. It took me several months to find one in a condition that was acceptable to me but it was well worth it. They are quiet with no mirror slap, easy to handle and certainly the results i've had from mine have been IMHO superb. I have been called old fashioned because i haven't got the latest digital toy hanging round my neck but i don't care. I won't be parting with it.

    Steve.

  6. #16
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
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    For my MF photography, I own a set of two Hasselblad bodies + lenses, backs, prisms etc etc and a Rolleiflex 2,8 F from the 60's.

    I make most of my MF personal work with the Rollei. It's sturdy, reliable, got a fine Planar lens, easy to use, quiet, vibration-free, fast, fun, light (compared to the Blads) and beautiful in general. As you can understand, I'm in love with it. Rollei used to make a pentaprism that fitted the camera (I don't think they still make it, although I'm not sure) that you can find on Ebay (if you're lucky). There is a Rolleiflex on sale at the moment WITH its prism and lots of other accessories (at a high price, I'm afraid).

    Parallax is corrected, there is a depth-of-field scale and a series of filters an close up lenses that fit the (taking, usually) lense. Double exposure is also possible. The finder (if you don't use a prism) has a mangifying lens (although it's very bright and you don't really need one). The F models also have incorporated selenium light metes that accept an accessory for incident metering (what modern camera can offer this alternative ?).

    You can work with a camera for all your life and never feel its age or get bored by it. Interchangeable lenses are not an issue with me, although when I need them I can use my other cameras.

    The new Rollei TLRs are overpriced, rich Japanese collectors objects. They have plastic in their mechanisms (eeerkk !!!!) and on the exterior parts sometimes (the 2,8 GX had a plastic focusing lever). They (the light meter) operate on batteries and have LEDs in the finder (!!!!!) and TTL flash control. They cannot be compared to the original 2,8 F. They look and feel like Japanese counterfeits, like Contax cameras from the 80's.

    Watch the auctions on Ebay and get yourself a Rolleiflex 2,8 F with a Zeiss Planar or a Schneider Xenotar (more expensive) lens in good condition. You'll never part with it.

  7. #17
    snaggs's Avatar
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    How well do waist level finders work in low light? As good as a rangefinder or SLR? or are they a bit dim?

    Daniel.

  8. #18
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    An SLR can have a waist level finder as well, so that's not really the axis of comparison. Also, some TLRs can take a prism for eye-level viewing.

    In general, a waist level finder will be brighter than a prism finder, because the prism eats light, but a prism does a better job at blocking out extraneous light than an open waist level finder, so it might be easier under certain conditions to focus with a prism. In low light, you'll probably find yourself using the magnifier with the WLF, holding it at chest level, so that your head will block most of the extraneous light, and under such conditions, it can work pretty well. It will depend on the quality and type of the focusing screen (often upgradable, even on old cameras), and the condition of the mirror (old ones can be dirty, tarnished, or worn).

    A nice thing to have, if it is an option on the camera you choose, is a chimney finder, which is just a simple magnifier that blocks out extraneous light. These have been made for SLRs and TLRs.

    Waist level finders are pretty stealthy for street shooting and candids. On the other hand, you can always pick out a wedding shot with a waist level finder camera, because you can see up everyone's nostrils.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #19
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snaggs
    How well do waist level finders work in low light? As good as a rangefinder or SLR? or are they a bit dim?

    Daniel.
    They can work fine in low light - how good is your eyesight? As far as brightness - that's a function of the focusing screen and speed of the viewing lens. Most lower priced fixed lens TLR's have an f/3.5 viewing lens. Some cameras, the Mamiya comes to mind, can have either a prism finder or a porro finder mounted. The porro finder gives you eyelevel viewing, but with mirrors instead of a prism - they are MUCH dimmer!

    This wasn't shot with a normal lens (I used a 55mm wide angle on a C-220), but it's one of my favorites. I braced myself against a door jamb and handheld this at 1/4 second on Ektachrome EPP.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  10. #20
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    Waist level finders are pretty stealthy for street shooting and candids. On the other hand, you can always pick out a wedding shot with a waist level finder camera, because you can see up everyone's nostrils.
    Come on David, haven't you ever held a waist level finder camera upside down over your head for a "Hail Mary" shot?

    hehehe
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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