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  1. #21
    Blighty's Avatar
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    TLRs......, you can't beat 'em. Never owned a Rollei, so I can't comment. But I own (and have owned) Mamiya TLRs, namely the C330f. Very quiet and with a shutter release handgrip attached, very stable. Focussing is on a par with other MF systems in terms of viewfinder brightness, but should you need one, then Beatttie do an 'Intenscreen'. The lenses are pretty good too, with (IMO) the 55mm being the best of the bunch. They might very well appeal to one's sense of nostalgia, but then again not everything modern represents progress. BLIGHTY.

  2. #22
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobfowler
    Come on David, haven't you ever held a waist level finder camera upside down over your head for a "Hail Mary" shot?

    hehehe
    How do ya think I got this one?--



    I'm not 10 feet tall.

    Bronica S2A (SLR), 50/3.5 at f:3.5, 1/15 sec. probably, waist-level finder, Tri-X/Acufine
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #23

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    My only Rolleiflex is a 50 year old Automat, yet the dimensions and control placements are similar to the current 2.8 GX, so I'll assume my experiences transfer to those cameras. As a big man with big paws, I find the Rolleiflex ergonomics to be superb. I hold the Rollei in the palm of my right hand with the back steadied up against my body, and my right thumb curling around the shutter release. My left hand is free for the focus knob. I find my thumb to be steadier and smoother squeezing the shutter release than my forefinger. Sight - focus - exhale - squeeze.... 1/15 is possible, and 1/8 might even work on good days. Find something to brace it on, and you can go even lower. Remarkable cameras.

  4. #24
    ScottH's Avatar
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    I'd say mine's a little of both, though my 'flex (2.8 E) from the late 50's isn't so much nostalgia per se, as it has 10+ years on me. I've only had it for 3 or so months and it's my first TLR, but it's been a joy to use. I'm still getting used to the left/right inversion, but that's only when the kids are running around. It can get as 'serious' as I need it to relative to it's optics - granted I won't be using flash with it. I'm looking forward to bringing it along on summer vacation. Maybe do a small portfolio of my uncle's dairy farm where I used to spend a few weeks each year working in the summer.

  5. #25
    Shmoo's Avatar
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    I "borrowed" a Rolleicord IV (TLR, consumer version, circa 1950) from a relative. The lens is absolutely amazing (Schneider Xenar 1:3.5 75mm). Negatives are tack sharp. It has become my keep-it-loaded-and-handy camera and I love it. Can't wait until it grows up into a real Rolleiflex...

    Last edited by Shmoo; 04-29-2005 at 04:07 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  6. #26
    adrian_freire's Avatar
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    I own a yashica-mat 124g and I love it. I bought it for 165 euros in a local shop and is one of the best deals I ever made. I use it for street shooting, portraits, landscapes... I feel really comfortable viewing the image in a big square and I thik it helps me to compose in a different way than when I use slr or rangefinder. And the funny side of the camer is the the people reacts different when I use the tlr (at least here where I live) , they are not so shy or agressive, I dont know way but I love it.

  7. #27
    adrian_freire's Avatar
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    You can usually attach a wide, tele or macro lens in the front of the camera so you can use different focal lengths with few stuff.

  8. #28

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    TLRs are exceptionally versatile cameras; handheld, tripod, good for a lot of things. The position you traditionally handhold them at seems easier to be stable than up at your eye. The only limitation is a fixed lens (not the C330, which is a lot bigger and has interchangable lenses). While I have an SLR that is my "main camera", I still enjoy using the TLR a lot and it's certainly serious enough.

  9. #29
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    For What it is worth, I have used Rollei, Mamia, Pentax a great deal, The rollei made the best negatives I have ever made, I went then to several Hasselblads and have never gotten the same quality negatives that I did with the Rollei. I still have the Hasselblads and a lots of lenses, but they in no way will compete with negatives I get from the Pentax 6x7. The results I am speaking of here are the results I personally have been able to achieve not here say or maybe. I have the negatives to back up my comments.

    My Rollei negs are the sharpest I have ever made, My hasselblad negatives made with several different bodys and lenses(still own three) are very good, but not comparable with the Rollie or Pentax.

    I owned several RB67's and liked the way they handled, but never was able to make l'st class negatives with them. The mirror slap in the Pentax
    while being hand held during weddings etc. has never been a problem for me. I supposed I have hand held it for years, since I didn't know any better. :-)

    My Rolleiflexs three of them packed snugly in their Halliburton case deserted me for someone else off of the carousel at LAX . I have never replaced them.

    My comments here are in no way a slap or slam at the products that have not performed for me to my expectations, I simply have related my experience using them for a lot of years makeing negatives with them.
    I personally do not like the square format, but often have used it to aid in
    telling my picture story. I much prefer a horizontal rectangle, but would not argue/debate one over the other.

  10. #30
    rjs003's Avatar
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    A TLR thread without my two cents, no way. I have three Yashica TLRs and when not shooting with my large format, it is the TLR that get used. Can't beat the quality of the glass and the feels of a real camera in your hands is something else. I do shoot a lot from a tripod, but that has more to do with my style of slow down photography then the camera's hand holding qualities. So for a low cost way into medium format, a good quality TLR is probably the best way to go.

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