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  1. #51
    Ole
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    I had a Lubitel for a while, long enough to learn that I liked the larger negatives. Then I sold it to a friend for two beers in a bar - a fair exhange
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  2. #52
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    I had a Lubitel for a while, long enough to learn that I liked the larger negatives. Then I sold it to a friend for two beers in a bar - a fair exhange
    You got the better end of the deal!
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  3. #53

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    Hey David,

    I like the academic, historical commentary, I know where to come when I need to find out something useful??? I always say that if someone dissagrees with you on anything, you know you're on to a winner, or at least you're doing something right. On saying that however I must agree, the Lubitel is the cheapest hunk of plastic ever put together, no problems with that comment, neither can I dissagree with the comments about its problems. I do know one thing though, I'd rather spend the £15-20 or so on one of these to try out the medium & the peculiarities than spend £100's just to find out I didn't fancy the idea after all. Unless of course you've got plenty spare cash in the basement which you want to blow on an experiment....if so I'll gladly take some off your hands in the name of science!!

    Oh...and I agree with Bob, Ole did get the better end of the deal but he did get an experimant out of it as well which must be better than just the two beers? Which bar was that then??

    Paul Berry

  4. #54

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    I've been using TLR's on and off, for years. My first was a MAT124G, brand new back in the 1970's. In a moment of temporary insanity, I sold it off. Years later, I got the itch again, and bought a 12 (virtually the same but less "fancy"). It's my main 120 camera. It's light, quiet, easy to use. My neighbor had a Lubitel which broke a month after she bought it, so she got a YashicaMat and it still works perfectly, just like mine.

  5. #55
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PB001
    Hey David,

    I like the academic, historical commentary ...
    Paul (I assume you mean me), I agree totally that it's good to experiment with low-cost equipment, it's just that I think the Lubitel has potential for major confusion with less experienced photographers. It is not only very tough to focus, it has no shutter speeds slower than 1/15, so beginners cannot practice shooting off a tripod at f16, which is where the triplet lens would give best definition, and also the shutter speeds (at least on mine) are dubious, which would confuse someone trying to expose their film accurately. As others have remarked, if you want medium-format quality at rock-bottom prices, the best way to go can be with a folding camera (Agfa Isolette, Zeiss Nettar, etc.). I have a Kodak 66 Mark III folder which cost £25 in mint condition and which I would prefer to a Lubitel every time.

    Regards,

    David

  6. #56
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Nicole Boenig-McGrade
    "I want one!!!!! "

    Hey, Nicole, why don't you sell this D70 you got from the shop with the sympathetic clerk and buy a Rolleiflex with the money ? I'm not sure if you'll get half of the $$$ you paid for the DigiCam back, since it must be now at least a few weeks old (so, almost obsolete), but the 50 year old Rolleiflex will be worth the money you'll give for it and it will actually get more and more precious as time passes. I got mine for 600 euros and now the are sold for twice this price (the 2,8 F of course).

    A Yashica is much cheaper, and will remain like that, too. A Rolleiflex TLR is an investment.

  7. #57

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    Nicole, I want a Hassey...

    But, I do have a Mamiya C330. I actually love it, and enjoy using it handheld, due to all the reasons said here.

    I tried a kowa Super66. I don't know if it operates like a Hassey but it scared me to death the first time I snapped the shutter. I had never seen the curtain before!!!

    Still, I think that a TLR is a great way to go for anyone wanting medium format. I use mine for stills, landscapes and photographing my kids.

  8. #58

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    Nice one!

    [QUOTE] Paul (I assume you mean me), I agree totally that it's....

    Hi Dave,

    Touche [is that how you spell it...I've never been too good a French] I guess we could go round in circles debating this point, talking about the pros & cons of the humble plastic artifact. This may use up valuable typing space, but that's probably about all? Interesting though?

    Hey Nicole,

    If you finally manges to get one from somewhere, I look forward to hearing all about it!!

    Paul Berry

  9. #59
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    A while back I placed an article on the Mamiya TLR lens systems on Bob Monagham's MF site at

    http://medfmt.8k.com/mf/mamiyaclens.html

    I wanted to place it here but as it contains a number of figures, I couldn't get it to "fit".
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  10. #60
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    I'd also recommend staying away from the Lubitel and it's Chinese comrade, the Seagull. If you're looking for a decent TLR that's not too expensive, try a Minolta Autocord or Yashicamat.
    Well, I have to disagree, a little. I've owned and used a Seagull (an older model, a 4B-1 with triplet lens, knob advance and red window framing, including capability for 6x4.5, though mine didn't include the mask), and it wasn't bad at all. The shutters in Seagulls are notoriously fragile, and the ironclad rule is *do not* change the shutter speed after cocking the shutter, but with no double exposure interlock on the older models, it's no big deal to cap the lens, release, change speed, and recock. I'm not certain this is an option with the newer crank-wound models (4A-105, -107, and -109), but these newer ones do incorporate a Tessar-type 4-element coated lens, accessory shoe, and I think self-cock on film advance (as well as not requiring the red window except for starting the counter). Bottom line is, for what they cost (about the same, brand new, as a 30-40 year old Yashica 124 or 124-G), they're not a bad camera -- nothing in common with Lubitel beyond twin lens and using 120 film -- but you can't count on how long they'll last.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

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