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  1. #1
    snaggs's Avatar
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    TLR's serious or nostalgic?

    Are new TLR's like Rollei's a serious or nostalgic camera option? I just happened to read something on (yes I know), dpreview, where someone said that the mirror slap on his Pentax 67 is so massive he muchs prefers a TLR when possible.

    Are they very useable hand-hold? or mainly tripod cameras? Anyone know what the difference between a new Expression 2.8 GX and the 2.8 FX would be?

    Daniel.

  2. #2
    Digidurst's Avatar
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    Hi Daniel I absolutely love my (Mamiya) TLR. I hand-hold it, where it on a neck strap, use it on a tripod... And while this may not be true, I have heard that the lack of mirror slap will enable you to get sharp hand-held shots at lower shutter speeds. Plus I really dig that square negative! So I guess if you are serious about capturing images than you get some seriously awesome shots with a TLR. Good luck to you and let us know what you decide.

  3. #3
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    TLRS were workhorses for a while.
    And yes they ar serious cameras! A mamiya 330 with interchangeable lenses would be a great option.

    Rolleiflexes are outstanding cameras, I don;t know the differences between the old and the new though
    Mama took my APX away.....

  4. #4
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snaggs
    Are new TLR's like Rollei's a serious or nostalgic camera option? I just happened to read something on (yes I know), dpreview, where someone said that the mirror slap on his Pentax 67 is so massive he muchs prefers a TLR when possible.

    Are they very useable hand-hold? or mainly tripod cameras? Anyone know what the difference between a new Expression 2.8 GX and the 2.8 FX would be?

    Daniel.
    I would say based on the price of a new Rollei TLR, they are indeed serious cameras, of course over the course of the last century most of the Rollei's have been quite good cameras with a very strong following.

    Even in this day and age, TLR photography is very serious and a great many of the camera are great performers, as Digi Said, I have also used them handheld, on a tripod and they produce great images.

    The mirror slap on the Pentax, can indeed be distracting, but there are a great number of photographers that use them quite successfully for serious work, The Pentax is a challenge to hand hold, it is a large heavy camera that just by its nature can cause you to shake due to the weight, I tried shooting one handheld a couple of years ago, with no success at all to the shear mass of the camera. So Tripod is the recommended way to use this camera.

    Dave

  5. #5
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    A TLR is quiet, easier to hand hold (you can cradle it with both hands, allowing you to easily break the 1/focal length rule for shutter speeds), and the lenses in the best are at least equal to anything you can buy, for any money, to fit a 'Blad.

    Even better, you can get high quality used TLRs with decades of life left in them for less than a single lens for a MF SLR. Sure, you're limited (with most of them) to a single focal length (unless you spring for a Mamiya C series), but I don't find that to be as limiting as it seems; 99% of the time I use the 50 mm lens on my Spotmatic...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  6. #6

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    You don't want to handhold a Gowland 8x10 TLR but MF TLRs are great handheld. TLRs have issues but then doesn't everything?

  7. #7
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    Even though I sold off all of my TLR gear last year to finance my Bronica system, I have a soft spot for the camera type. It's tougher to do with a C-series Mamiya, but with a lighter, fixed-lens TLR such as a Yashica Mat 124G or Minolta Autocord, I could handhold at 1/8 sec and get negatives that were sharp enough for an 11x14 enlargement. The best I could do with the 80mm lens on the Mamiya C-220 or C-3 (handheld) was about 1/30th - and that was kinda pushing the limit.

    I think part of the Mamiya's problem with handholding (compared to the Yashica and Minolta) is the layout of the shutter release. On those two fixed lens cameras, I could cradle the body with my left hand and use my left index finger on the release - a motion that pushed the release button into the body. The C-220 and C-3 required me to use my right thumb and push down on the right side of the body. I found that to be a bit more awkward, but I still loved those cameras...

    Regardless, the lack of mirror slap and the super quiet operation of the shutters made them perfect for shooting wedding ceremonies using available light.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  8. #8
    snaggs's Avatar
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    I really like the square format. Are they rangefinders? How do you focus?

    Daniel.

  9. #9
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snaggs
    I really like the square format. Are they rangefinders? How do you focus?

    Daniel.
    No, not rangefinders...

    You have two lenses of equal focal length, mounted on a movable plate one atop the other. The bottom lens has a shutter and is used to expose the film, the top lens is used to project an image on the groundglass (via a mirror) for focusing. Hence the name, Twin Lens Reflex.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  10. #10
    127
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    I guess the biggest factor is do you want a waist level finder?
    If so, then can you live with a single lens?

    If you answer yes to both of those, then a TLR is the thing to have.

    On the other hand the new Rollei is WAY expensive. If I was in a situation to justify that kind of cash on a new camera I'd grab one like a shot, but in the mean time "previously operated" tlr's are a bargain.

    One of my main cameras is a Baby Rollei - nostalga? Maybe a bit, but it's an ideal working camera for a lot of stuff that I like to do. Now if they were to release a new baby... I'd have to start saving...

    Ian

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