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  1. #11
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Did you adjust for the efective speed of the D70 being 200?

    Also, some films are different between 35mm and 120. Tri-X comes in both a 400 and a 320 speed in 120, but only 400 speed in 35mm.

  2. #12
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    My guess is that either...

    A) the cameras were not all set to the same "film speed" (in quotes because well, the D70 has no film...???)

    or,

    B) they're using different "intelligence" to meter the scene (as somebody already suggested).

    What happens if you point both meters at something really boring like, evenly lit blacktop or a patch of grass (again, evely lit - either all in sun or all in shade)? The readings should be pretty close - especially if the cameras are both set to the same film speed.

    Once again, you can do a sanity check by comparing the readings to the "Sunny-16" rule...

  3. #13

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    Personally, I have found that the meters on many DSLRS are accurate, in that they produce repeatable results, but are often not calbrated to the represented ISOs. Your answer is to use the same meter (whether it's the camera or a hand-held) all the time and a LOT. Through trial-and-error, you will develop a feel for how it's readings correlate to your film speed. Then you're laughing.

    For what it's worth, my best friend does all of his LF metering with his Nikon F6, and it works just fine, since he's learned its characteristics.

  4. #14
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    The D70 program is designed in order to not blow the highlights. This could be the problem. When the camera thinks instead of you and you dont know how the camera thinks... but you can measure the light in differet little zones (using the logest focal length of the lens ) and deduce the correct f and t. Don't let the camera choose between a range of different amount light. Or you could buy a hand meter at ebay, I bought a Sekonic L-248 for 10 $ shipping included (from california to europe) and I think it's a great meter ( and much less heavy than your metered camera).

  5. #15

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    If you drop that second metering camera, you'll wonder why there's not a $20 Pilot in your pocket.

  6. #16

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    Both cameras indeed give a more or less the same reading when pointed at a dark subject with little contrast. The difference can be hughe though when aimed at high contrast subjects or bright things.

    I think I am going for a cheap light meter after all, the more intelligent the machine the harder it is to understand... Manufacturers don't understand.

  7. #17
    Blighty's Avatar
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    With a seperate hand-held meter you have the option of taking an 'incident' reading (if it has an incident attachment, that is!). BLIGHTY.
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quinten
    Both cameras indeed give a more or less the same reading when pointed at a dark subject with little contrast. The difference can be hughe though when aimed at high contrast subjects or bright things.

    I think I am going for a cheap light meter after all, the more intelligent the machine the harder it is to understand... Manufacturers don't understand.
    Manufacturers all seem to assume that consumers are idiots.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quinten
    ...I think I am going for a cheap light meter after all, the more intelligent the machine the harder it is to understand... Manufacturers don't understand.
    Wise election, small grasshopper.

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