Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,674   Posts: 1,481,900   Online: 1114
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    bjorke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    SF & Surrounding Planet
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,032
    Images
    20
    That Robt White price on the RF645 IS a steal -- less for the 2-lens pkg than what B&H gets for just the body. I'll be in London in three weeks, so I wrote to them right off....

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    20
    I have the Bronica RF645 with 65 and 100mm lenses. Before I got it, I borrowed a Mamiya 7 with the 80mm for a few days. Especially with a lens mounted, the Bronica is much smaller and I found it to handled better. I thought the 65mm was the best medium format lens I have ever used (and I've used many). It's sharper and smoother bokeh than the Mamiya 80mm. The Bronica 65mm is sharper when looking at the negative, but not enough sharper to make up for the larger negative, but plenty sharp enough to make a great 16x20 which is as big as I ever print.

    One main reason I bought the camera was for travel and walking around all day so the smaller size and more shots per roll were a great advantage. I do have a 6x7 SLR (Bronica GS-1) with a bunch of lenses for when camera size doesn't matter. I might have made a different choice for an only medium format camera.

    John

  3. #13
    Mongo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    960
    I have a GA645Pro, a forerunner to the 645zi. If the new camera is anything like the GA645Pro, then it'll take great images but it's the closest thing you'll find to a medium format point-and-shoot. (The biggest difference between the two cameras is the lens. The 645zi has a 55-90mm zoom lens, whereas the 645Pro has a fixed 60mm lens.)

    You can manually focus the 645Pro, but you won't want to. Tap the AF button, then hold the MF button and spin the wheel...and watch the numbers change in the viewfinder to indicate the distance at which you're focused. There's no rangefinder patch in the viewfinder, but thankfully it is parallax-corrected.

    Manual exposure is pretty easy, and the built in meter is good. Aperture priority and Program mode are both supported. The lens on the 645Pro is top notch, and the images are excellent. But the camera really is made for automated operation, and focusing it manually feels more like a work-around than an elegant solution. I don't know if the zi improved on this or not.

    Having said all of this, I'd buy the camera again in a heartbeat if I didn't already own it. Having a reasonably sized, quick-to-use 6x4.5 camera is a very nice option.

    Good luck with your decision.
    Dave
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    NW Chicagoland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    534
    Images
    1
    The Fuji 645Zi is not really a rangefinder camera. You use the autofocus or a manual guess focus distance. It's advantage is a complete package without having to change lenses. The zoom is limited but very usefull. Also the cost isn't bad. One problem I've had is using a cable release. I normally use a tripod but still got sharper results with the release. Others may not have this problem. Anyhow with the release you can't lock in exposure or distance values, adjust the composition and expose. So if I want to use values other than the ones picked using the final composition I have to manually set them in. A true manual camera would be better.

    I'd say if you can afford it go with the Mamiya 7. You will need to carry and change lenses. Bronica or Fuji Zi depends on how much manual control you want. I would think that the Fuji would be faster using the zoom and auto focus. I've had no problems using the Fuji meter but only for B&W and I sometimes lock exposure on a certain part of the picture. Lens is very good but my usual size is only 6x9ish prints. Also very good at close focus distance of around 3 meters.
    Chuck

  5. #15
    luvcameras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    379

    Fuji 6x4.5 page

    I have a page devoted to the Fuji 6x4.5 cameras....

    http://members.aol.com/dcolucci/fujirf.htm

    Dan
    www.antiquecameras.net

  6. #16
    narsuitus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    517
    Also consider the Fuji 6x7cm or 6x9cm rangefinders.

  7. #17
    bjorke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    SF & Surrounding Planet
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,032
    Images
    20
    My buddy Rich also runs The Fuji Rangefinder Pages

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  8. #18
    lee
    lee is offline
    lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Fort Worth TX
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,913
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    I am confused. You say you are getting a "Jones" for a MF RF. You mean with your "Johnson"?
    old time drug reference to having a "Jones" meaning want or need or desire for an object or substance. Not related to his "Johnson".

    lee\c

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    376

    mf rangefinder

    I had a Mamiya 7II and a 43, 100 and a 150. Good camera. I also have a crown graphic 4x5 with a graflok back that I like better. Roll film, movements, no meter, all kinds of lens choices, some close ups, so the answer is: try one first.

    I got rid of the 7II too heavy for the negative size.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Phoeinx Arizona
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,343
    If you long for a light weight Medium Format rangefinder look for a baby speed or crown 2 1/4 by 2 3/4 or 6 by 9 with a graflok back. The crown is lighter because it doesn't have the focal shutter on the back. As with the Crown and Speed 4X5s some movement, can use interchangable lens (usually only the standard lens is coupled with the rangefinder, but with late models if you can find or make cams lens might couple) with a short bellows you can do some marco and use long lens. With the ground glass back you can use as felid camera. Very good selecton of lens. Down side, parts are hard to come by, not all of the lens will sycn with flash, or you need an adaptor, no build in light meter. I have both a 4X5 Speed and Crown, easy to use reliable and I often wished I had a baby Crown.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin