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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_Baker
    Not exactly a handholdable camera but the Fuji gx680 does tilt/shift stuff.
    Thanks folks. I looks like there is no hand holdable camera with ability to correct converging lines, so it looks like the ebony 23S on a tripod is it.

  2. #12

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    I hate to say this, but it seems like the reason there isn't a handholdable tilt/shift camera is because you can't really handhold a camera and do things like adjust for converging lines. If your going to go through the trouble of adjusting for things like that the camera should be mounted so that you aren't moving the camera around, thereby affecting the degree of convergence. Just a thought.

    Paul B.

  3. #13
    Helen B's Avatar
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    It is possible to hand hold a camera with lens rise - I do it quite frequently. The way I do it is not to try to adjust the amount of rise, but to estimate it beforehand (easy with experience), put the camera to your eye, then level it. Repeat after adjusting, as necessary. The other way of doing it is to use a 6x9 when you want 6x6 - that's the equivalent of using rise.

    Best,
    Helen

  4. #14
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    There are a number of 1920s and older 120 and postcard format cameras with rise or rise and shift. Almost none from that era with other movements (tilts or swings). If you get a good bellows or can repair or replace a bad one, have a quality lens in a shutter you can bring up to snuff, these cameras can do anything a 1960 vintage Moskva-5 can do except focus with a rangefinder -- plus the movements.

    As Helen suggests, hand holding with rise or rise and shift isn't hard at all. You need a camera with a wire frame finder for best results (these were pretty common prior to 1940 on 6x9 and large formats, almost universal on cameras with movements), because the wire frame automatically compensates for the movements in terms of showing you what part of the scene is actually going on the film. Set up your movements, compose through the wire frame, and trip the shutter -- wind on and all done.

    Of course, many of these older cameras were something of a nightmare, ergonomically -- my Voigtlander Rollfilmkamera is pretty easy to hold in portrait format, but quite difficult to hold steady while operating the shutter in landscape, as that puts the shutter release underneath the shutter housing. Still better than the Moskva, though, which is well nigh impossible to hold steady in landscape with its body release...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  5. #15
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The Bronica tilt-shift bellows is really just for macro and tabletop work. I have one. Once you clear the mirror and the bellows flange, you still need to have the bellows extended somewhat to be flexible enough for movements, so it's not really practical to use with wide lenses for architecture. It's also quite bulky, if you were thinking of handholding it.

    Cambo Wide DS or Silvestri with a rollfilm back might be options. The Linhof Technorama cameras have some rise built in.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #16
    rjr
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    There is an affordable line of Shift and Tilt/Shift lenses available for the Pentacon Six mount. There are adapters available to mount it on most 645 systems and a few full frame 6x6 cameras (not only Kiev60, Kiev88Six/CM or Pentacon 6/Praktisix).

    I own the Arsat C PCS4,5/55 and I am VERY pleased by the performance.

    OTOH I wouldn´t use it handheld - neither the lens nor the camera. The Kiev88 is a lightweight and compact camera, but I don´t like to use it that way.
    Tschüss,
    Roman

  7. #17
    TerryThomasAtlanta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by These people make really neat rail cameras, but you mentioned you were not interested in those.

    [url
    http://www.shelro.com/products%20infor/1_1.htm[/url]
    The "Liere Minima" is exactly what I've been looking for. It will use my RB lenses and backs.

    It's a bit more than I can afford at about $700US for their basic package but now I'll have something to look for on eBay.

    Terry Thomas...
    the photographer
    Atlanta, Georgia USA

    Some of my stills from a recent movie are here: www.psychopathia.com

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