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  1. #1
    MenacingTourist's Avatar
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    Lens questions for RB-67 users

    I've been shooting with a 90mm and have found myself trying to compose much too close. I think what I need is a longer lens but I have nothing to base a purchase on. I'm very interested in portrait work and kind of like the idea of the 150mm with diffusing discs but then what about the 180mm?

    I guess what I'm asking is who shoots with these lenses and what do you like and dislike about them?

    Thanks in advance,

    Alan.

  2. #2
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    I have 50, 90 and 180 lenses. All perform to a consistently high standard (the 50 has very slight barrel distortion). As you note yourself, the 180 is a general-purpose lens (which I find great for portraits) while the 150 has been designed rather more with portraits in mind. With the 150 you will tend to work slightly closer to the subject and thus obtain slightly more rounded drawing - which is of course entirely a matter of personal taste.

  3. #3

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    They are all sharp and quite contrasty. The 50 and 90 have barrel distortion that I personally find too much coupled with straight lines like buildings. The 180 is a brilliant lens all round although mine needs its small screws tightening now and then (under the f stop ring) to keep it whole!. I'm sure the 150 will be a good lens.

  4. #4
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David H. Bebbington
    I have 50, 90 and 180 lenses.
    interesting, I have each of these also - however the 50 and 180 are RZ lenses, the 90 is an RB -

    I find myself using the 50 the most and 180 next, have used a 127mm also, but its since got jock itch, I would rather the 90 had - ah well - I say go with the 180, as I have had good results with it, and its good to get a fair amount of variance in focal lengths if you only have the 2 or 3 lenses -

    hope I didnt confuse things!

  5. #5
    roy
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    I have only one lens, the 90 and find that covers what I want to do at the present.
    Roy Groombridge.

    Cogito, ergo sum.
    (Descartes)

  6. #6

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    I have an Rz not Rb. I have a 210 Apo which serves very nicely for a portrait lens and which may offer the very best correction of any lens in Rz line. I believe that the lens is also available in Rb mount.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  7. #7
    rogueish's Avatar
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    I have a 90, a 150 soft focus, and a 250. I use the 150 (without the diffusor screens usually) for the most part. I hardly ever use the 90 any more.
    While I do landscapes, it's not the wide sweeping, but smaller elements in the scene. The 250 I use mostly for macro. The 150 has worked out just fine for the little portrait work I have done.

    I would think which lens could be decided by how much space you have. There isn't a lot of difference (in focusing power) between the 150 and the 180, but if your in a shorter room, the 180 may require more room length. The 150 SF gives the advantage of giving 3 diffuser screens, but you can always add that in the darkroom while printing later.

    Don't forget there is also a 140 macro, plus a 127 (I was told this was "the portrait lens" :rolleyes: for my camera, and no I didn't buy it) .

  8. #8
    MenacingTourist's Avatar
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    You guys are the greatest!

    My studio space is roughly 18' long but after you factor in bringing the subject away from the background 5 or 6 feet...I'm leaning towards the 150 unless people think I could get by with a 180 in that space.

    Thanks again for your comments,

    Alan.

  9. #9
    Mongo's Avatar
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    Just to muddy the waters, I thought I'd throw my experience into this discussion. I use the 140 (the macro lens) as my portrait lens with the RB and I really like the results.

    I got the 140 rather than the 150 for it's quality as a close-up lens, but I've been thrilled with the results I've gotten from it as a portrait lens. When shooting anything but close-ups I just leave the floating element at infinity...and the results have been great.

    I haven't used the 150, so I can't compare the 140 to that lens, but I found that I liked the 140 more than the 180. Just a personal opinion though...your mileage may (and probably will) vary.

    Be well.
    Dave
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by MenacingTourist
    I've been shooting with a 90mm ... what about the 180mm?
    Mamiya is the only manufacturer I know of to offer a
    1.414 lens series; 65, 90, 127, 180, 250, 360. Each
    increase in those focal lengths reduces by one half
    the area of coverage, no more, no less.

    I'd recommend the 180. I used a 180 on 6x6 and
    found myself too distant. It should work well with
    6x7. Better depth of field control with the
    longer focal length. Dan

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