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  1. #1

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    light and f stop

    Will a 110mm f2.8 give the same shutter speed (in same lighting sitiation) as a 80mm f2.8

  2. #2

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    Yes.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  3. #3
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
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    Just so you know that there is a consensus out here, yes as well.

  4. #4

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    thanks paul and Clare. I thought it would but I try not to get to much into the tech side of photography, it reduces some of the fun for me

  5. #5
    Ole
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    That's not "the tech side of photography", it's basic knowledge.

    ALL lenses will let in the same amount of light, thus giving the same exposure with the same shutter time under the same lighting conditions. That's why they all use the same numbers.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #6
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    Not a stupid question...I pretty much made the assumption, but, having no formal photog training, wasn't rock solid on the matter; glad you asked and were answered. 2.8 is 2.8 is 2.8.......

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by bohica
    thanks paul and Clare. I thought it would but I try not to get to much into the tech side of photography, it reduces some of the fun for me
    bohica, craft precedes art. If you want to produce the results you want, not some random who knows what, you're going to have to master the craft. That means learning technique.

    Sorry, that's how it is,

    Dan

  8. #8

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    It is probbably a good time to explain what an fstop means. F stands for fraction. If you use a 100mm lens at f4 then the fstop is 1/4th of th focal length or 25mm. If you set f8 on a 50mm lens then the fstop is 1/8 the focal length or 6.25mm.


    The f stop markings are computed with the lens focused at infinity. If you focus at a distance of less th 8 focal lengths away you have to start allowing for the fact that your lens's fstop markings are sufficiently different from infinity and allow for it.

    That is enough lesson for the day.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  9. #9

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    i know what f stops are, been amerture or pro for over 30 yrs, just didn't know if the longer focal length would change the amount of light even though the opening was larger, you guys belong on betterphoto.com, ask any question there and you'll get forulas to figure it out, i now photo for FUN, if you can't handle that then don't read my post

  10. #10
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    even though the opening size on a longer lens is larger, in theory based on the standarization of the f/stop, the light reaching the film will be the same, hence the same shutter speed for the same exposure as a shorter lens, there are variables that come into equations based on how true the aperture is based on the manufactures tolerances, but yes, an f/stop is a f/stop across the broad range of lenses.

    Dave

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