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  1. #21
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    1. If you need lenses longer than what is available for the TLR, you need the SLR.
    2. If you need lenses that are wider than what is available for the TLR, you need the SLR.
    3. If you need to attach the camera to a microscope, you need the SLR.
    4. If you need to see the depth of field in the viewfinder, you need the SLR.
    5. If you need less hassle with parallax, you need the SLR.
    6. If you need to see the filter effect in the viewfinder, it is easier with the SLR.
    7. If you need easy focusing with a dark filter on the lens, you need the TLR.
    8. If you need quiet operation, you need the TLR.
    9. If you need minimal camera vibration when the shutter is released, you need the TLR.
    10. If you prefer a camera with fewer moving parts, you need the TLR.
    11. If you need to see the subject in the viewfinder at the moment of exposure, you need the TLR.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by narsuitus
    1. If you need lenses longer than what is available for the TLR, you need the SLR.
    2. If you need lenses that are wider than what is available for the TLR, you need the SLR.
    3. If you need to attach the camera to a microscope, you need the SLR.
    4. If you need to see the depth of field in the viewfinder, you need the SLR.
    5. If you need less hassle with parallax, you need the SLR.
    6. If you need to see the filter effect in the viewfinder, it is easier with the SLR.
    7. If you need easy focusing with a dark filter on the lens, you need the TLR.
    8. If you need quiet operation, you need the TLR.
    9. If you need minimal camera vibration when the shutter is released, you need the TLR.
    10. If you prefer a camera with fewer moving parts, you need the TLR.
    11. If you need to see the subject in the viewfinder at the moment of exposure, you need the TLR.
    1. Yes
    2. Yes
    3. Yes
    4. Yes
    5. Yes
    6. Yes
    7. Yes
    8. Yes
    9. Yes
    10. Yes
    11. Yes
    Ohoooh I need both.........well actually I got both.
    Now lets talk about those 6x9, 4'x5' and 5'x7'
    S°ren

  3. #23
    laz
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    He who dies with the most cameras wins!
    [SIZE=1]I want everything Galli has![/SIZE]
    [SIZE=1]I want to make images like Gandolfi![/SIZE]
    rlazell@optonline.net

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by medform-norm
    Hmm, if that is so, why then did you bid on the Boyer Beryl a couple of days ago, which, incidentally, is soon to travel northwards to Holland...
    Fair question.

    It is a tiny little lens, won't break my back. That's why I carry a 4.75"/7.7 Aldis Uno as well as a 127/4.7 Tominon (or 135/5.6 Symmar if it wins the shootout). Also why I carry a 6"/9 Cooke Copying Lens as well as a 160/5.6 Pro Raptar. And of course the Uno and 6" Cooke shoot very well.

    It fills the monstrous gap between 80 mm and 100 mm. And I don't have another 90.

    Boyer made some fine lenses. I'm very happy with my two Apo Saphirs and my dagor type 210/7.7.

    If I had won the auction, the price would have been right. You won it, I gather, and paid more than the lens is worth to me.

    So, are you going to mount the Beryl on a pocketable 6x9 folder?

    Cheers,

    Dan

  5. #25
    medform-norm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm
    So, are you going to mount the Beryl on a pocketable 6x9 folder?

    Cheers,

    Dan
    Well, sort of. We will either use it on our 'pocketable' Graphic View or on the midget Optika IIa. But hmm, mounting it on a folder? There's an idea. We'll try it on the left-over Telka III. Indeed, it's a very versatile lens. Let's wait and see what it's like. Maybe it's a real nice lens with a very special character. Otherwise I'll put her back on the market and make you a first offer

    Price was about right for us - we pay less shipping costs within Europe, so we save on that compared to you. Would have bid like you when it was on sale in the US.

  6. #26

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    For me, its slightly the what and where which dictates which one I use but usually, its a mood... When I do standard portraits, I usually use my 645 (slr)... When I want to immerse myself in what I am shooting, I use the C330... But, many times, its just my mood...

  7. #27
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Since fully 23% of all portrait clients die of shock when photographed by a 120 SLR,
    it is essential to own a fine Rolleiflex, or Mamiya TLR. Or a Minolta Autocord.

    If one insists on shooting with a Hasselblad, it is imperative to be paid in full before the sitting.

    One should alway wear hearing protection when using a 120 SLR.

    .
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  8. #28
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I'm down to 3 6x6 cameras (well, I've got two S2a bodies, so count 4 if you must)

    Bronica S2a system--versatile, modular system that does just about anything I need from a MF camera.

    Voigtlander Superb TLR--beautiful, innovative, lightweight piece of history, that's quiet and inconspicuous for street shooting.

    Voigtlander Perkeo II folder--the "pocketblad" that goes anywhere, smaller than many 35mm rangefinder cameras.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #29

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    Lets not forget the wonderfull Yashicamats!

  10. #30
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    You have to be kidding! Why? WHY!?
    Also - you think you only need one of each?! There are so many SLR's... not to mention TLR's... RF's... and on and on...

    Jokes aside - you will soon find that there are situations where the TLR is king, some where it may indeed prove to be the only way to take a photo, and on the other hand - you will definitely run into situations where the opposite is true. I find a TLR such a great stealth camera - most people now days dont even know what one is, hence, they dont pay attnetion to it, or at lease have no idea whent the picture will come and - out of which end of the camera!
    In the end, you will want all the pretty cameras - the only question is, given that we also need food and shelter and such, is which tog et first - and in that case I thin the SLR is a little more flexible therefore would get my nod (unless I had a TLR in my hand...- just kidding!)

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