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  1. #1
    Sean's Avatar
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    Just processed my first blank roll of film - ugh

    Well I had high hopes for this roll. This is from the shoot with John and Robert last weekend. It would have probably had 3 of my best negs, and it was shot with my 645. The roll came out blank so I am almost 100% sure I must have loaded the film backwards and exposed nothing but blackout paper? It was the first time I ever used 120roll (previously used polaroid 665 negs). I guess I'll grab a few expired films from the shop and practice loading again and shoot a quick test roll. The camera seems fine, shutter is firing properly, etc. sigh..

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Sean,

    Welcome to the club, your no longer a virgin!!!

    We have all been there done that one, probably more than once....

    Practice, and practice again, and don't be real surprised if it happens again...

    Welcome to the club...

    Dave

  3. #3
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
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    You don't think maybe it was mad at you for trying to sell it?

    The film does go around kind of funny, but I am not sure how one would misload it. I might waste a roll just to see if it is possible. What a bummer. Somehow I have managed to avoid this particular problem, but with the 50 or so sheets of 4X5 I shot before I got one evenly developed sheet, I can feel your pain.

  4. #4
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Hopefully this will make you feel better, at least by comparison. I freelanced very often at two adjacent studios 20+ years ago. I was already booked at one, so the other hired a new assistant in town who had graduated from RIT in Rochester, NY. He assured them he knew how to load the MF film backs, and he set up a number of backs for a shoot for a large department store chain. The photographer went through three different shots before he convinced himself that there was something really wrong with the way the film had been loaded and opened a back to find that he'd been shooting on the backing paper of 120 film. He had to reshoot the group he had on set, and had to call back 10 models for the other two shots he'd finished at his expense, about $70 to $100 an hour for each model.

    I know you lost shots you really wanted, but at least it's not costing you a lot of money.

    The first studio I worked in tested my 4x5 loading before hiring me. I had to clean and load a dozen 4x5 holders and the photographer then checked the film orientation in every one before he would hire me. That was after I assured him that I could load film properly. When we shot his Hasselblads for the first time, I told him I'd not loaded one before, so I did some practice rolls until we were both satisfied.

    The worst thing I did (for the same studio with the reversed film problem) was lose a roll of exposed 120 shooting on location in a very crowded knick-knack / novelty shop. We searched high and low and never found it.

    Lee

  5. #5
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    Sorry for your loss. However, be thankful that it was not worse. You could have lost a roll of color film that you took the time and effort to mix the chemicals and hand process yourself.

  6. #6

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    Yup!! Done that one, more than once...first time was when shooting some stuff for someone (had a backup 35mm of all the 120's) right after I got the camera. 2nd time was after I had not used it in a while and sure enough. It seems like it should be hard to do, but somehow it isn't. All I know is, when I take the film insert out of the camera when a roll is finished, if I see the color of the paper (Ilford=white, Kodak=yellow,etc) then I know life is good, if all I see is black...as in the back of the backing paper, well then I know I better have some backup or plan to re-shoot.

    Sorry Sean....I know it stinks, but bet you don't ever do it again....or maybe once more.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  7. #7
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Wait till you get the hang of loading the film and go out and get the shot of a lifetime with the most magnificent light you can imagine. Rush home and load the tank, prepare the chemicals paying special attention to the temperature for you want this roll to be perfectly developed. Put the first solution into the tank and before you stop pouring you know that you've put the fixer in first. Been there done that !*^0£"3

    Welcome to the club Sean
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  8. #8
    Dinesh's Avatar
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    I went out the other evening and took what I thought were some potentially decent shots, only to find out when I got home that I hadn't loaded any film into my A12 magazine. Is it possible for a person to regress in intelligence?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean
    Wait till you get the hang of loading the film and go out and get the shot of a lifetime with the most magnificent light you can imagine. Rush home and load the tank, prepare the chemicals paying special attention to the temperature for you want this roll to be perfectly developed. Put the first solution into the tank and before you stop pouring you know that you've put the fixer in first. Been there done that !*^0£"3

    Welcome to the club Sean
    Luckily, I haven`t had made such mistakes as that yet apart from under/overdeveloping and stupid exposure errors at the taking stage (I think we have probably all done that at one time or another).
    I would have been gutted if I had blank negatives, which is one of the reasons why I dread being asked to photograph Weddings which of course can not be repeated if mistakes are made. Wedding photography is a stressful career in my opinion. Blank negs and you get sued.

  10. #10
    RAP
    RAP is offline

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    Oh sure, have I ever done that? No one has to know and I'll never tell. :rolleyes:
    Time & tides wait for no one, especially photographers.

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