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  1. #1

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    Zeiss 531/2 help please

    Hi

    I have just managed to purchase the above folder.

    At the back on the door are the 2 windows for viewing film number. The right hand one seems to be for 6 x 9 and the left hand one seems to indicate 4.5 x 6.

    My question, bearing in mind mine actually came with the mask plate, how do i go about knowing when to stop winding.

    I have guessed that perhaps when using 6x9 format i just use right hand window and stop when number 1 appears, shoot, then wind to number 2 etc. With the mask inserted in the camera do I wind until 1 appears in the right hand window, shoot, then wind until 1 appears in the left hand window, shoot and then wind until 2 appears in the right hand window, and continue in this manner.

    This seems the only logical way to me, but i'll most probably get shot down in flames with something that will be obvious.


    Regards



    Darryl

  2. #2
    medform-norm's Avatar
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    Darryl,

    I see an opportunity for a learning curve here! Get an old/outdated 120 film and unroll it. (If none available, get a cheap new one and note down the money as learning investment). Look at the paper-backed side of the film. Look at the different numbers marked on it in different places. Roll up the film again and put it in the camera. Wind the film through the camera as if you were making exposures. Once with the mask, once without the mask. Notice what happens in the different windows.

    Without giving away the winning clue, I imagine you will find out how this works quite quickly. And finding out things for yourself is more fun than having someone trying to explain things to you.

    Good luck!
    Norm

  3. #3
    laz
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    I have a Zeiss 531/2 and had the same question when I got it. What Norm suggests will reveal all!

    -Bob (no clue from me)
    [SIZE=1]I want everything Galli has![/SIZE]
    [SIZE=1]I want to make images like Gandolfi![/SIZE]
    rlazell@optonline.net

  4. #4

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    Good Morning, Darryl,

    Since you'll be using the red window approach, the simple procedure suggested by Norm actually requires only the backing paper from a roll of 120 you've already shot; there's no need to sacrifice a fresh roll of film.

    Konical

  5. #5
    medform-norm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Konical
    Good Morning, Darryl,

    Since you'll be using the red window approach, the simple procedure suggested by Norm actually requires only the backing paper from a roll of 120 you've already shot; there's no need to sacrifice a fresh roll of film.

    Konical
    I second that! Good tip from Konical. Otherwise: we'll be here waiting for your results

  6. #6

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    Okay. now I know

    Many thanks

  7. #7
    medform-norm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyrrad
    Okay. now I know

    Many thanks
    and....did you have fun?

  8. #8

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    Learning is ALWAYS fun.

    Next question.

    With or without film in the camera the following is possible:

    When using the winder the red window (near the winder) informs me of unexposed frame. All is well if i cock the shutter and press shutter release. The indicator goes from red to white.

    However, if I forget to cock the shutter, and press the shutter release button (not a featherlight touch, but as if I was about to take a photograph) the action of pressing the release button causes the red window to change to white. Now when I cock the shutter I am unable to press the shutter release button for obviuos reasons.


    My question is:

    Is this faulty, or is this just the way it is with this camera.
    Last edited by Lyrrad; 11-06-2005 at 03:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9

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    That's just how it is. However, all is not lost. You can always trip the shutter, using the small flap that is near the lens/shutter assembly.

    This is useful for intentional double exposures or those times when you press the shutter release but forgot to tension the shutter, which you describe above.

    These are really amazing cameras. I've serviced several, and once they've been tuned up, they can produce results that can be simply stunning. Congratulations on owning a true classic.

  10. #10
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    No, it's faulty. The shutter release button should be LOCKED when the shutter is not cocked, and what you describe should happen only by pushing the button with an outstanding pressure of the finger (= almost breaking the device). Your unit probably gained gear tolerances over time. No need to fix it, though, if you are aware of the problem and use it accordingly.

    The two windows system for 4,5x6 was conceived since 120 rolls didn't have the specific 1-16 numbers sequence for 4,5x6 format at the time, so it was thought to "recycle" the 6x9 sequence with the second window. A good trick!

    The fact that you have the reducing mask yelds to the hypothesis that your unit is equipped with a Tessar lens. Which aperture? And on which shutter? I'm particularly fond of this specific model, so I'm always happy when I meet someone who's still using it.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

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