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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Lawton
    You didn't mention what reel you are using. If it is a plastic Patterson type then jump up and down on it and never use it for 120 again! I'm being a little sarcastic but honestly those things are a serious problem when it comes to 120. (at least for me) All too often the wider more flexible film base of 120 bends,buckles or jams with the auto loading reels despite ensuring that they were bone dry. Stainless steel is a piece of cake and can be loaded wet as well.
    I must say that apart from the film curling and twisting in the dark I havn't had any problem loading 120 film on..................... Paterson reels.
    135 however is another story. If I don't clean my reels after developing some 120 films I'm sure to have problems loading the longer 35mm on them, they jam a little more than halfway through.
    S°ren
    1 post closer to my 500 :rolleyes:

  2. #12

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    I too find Patterson reels fairly easy to load with 120 (and 220). They need to be absolutely dry and you need to pull the film through the guides and little ball barings, rather than push it. Someone said they have more trouble loading 35mm. I tend to leave the leader out and put that onto the reel in the light, then do the rest in the dark. Obviously you can't do that with medium format, but it's no major problem.

    David.

  3. #13

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    I can't load plastic reels with 120, be it Patterson or Generic.. I mean, I can get the film on there but I end up kinking the film pretty badly. I've smashed more than one reel before.. I'm thinking that high-humidity might have played a part in my troubles.
    Either that or gunked-up ball-bearings.

    I liked the jobo 120 reel, the real big/wide ones that also take 220 I think.
    Although I don't know if I was ever loading it properly; I just 'pushed' the film in. Worked well for me though.

  4. #14

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    Try with HAMA tank and reels: http://www.hama.de/products/photostu...ment/index.hsp.

    I am not using them anymore, I am usind JOBO now. But HAMA was my first tank-reels combo, and loading both 35mm and 120 film was a child play. In fact, I am thinking buying it again...

  5. #15
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    I must agree that loading 120 onto a plastic reel is not a fun task. Loading 35mm onto one of the reels is quite simple, but 120 is quite a trick. I spend 5 or 10 minutes funmling with hte curling, buckling film (this is especially hard with a film like Lucky SHD, which is unbelievably curly ...)

  6. #16

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    They used to sell a device which cupped the film just right to fit on the reel and keep your hands from direct contact with the film. These were small curved sheets of metal with a lip on the edges to hold the film. Tried to find one for a friend but couldn't find any new. They came in 35mm, 127 and 120 film sizes that I know of. The 120 size is very handy and I use it routinely. Perhaps a fellow APUGer knows where to find one.

  7. #17

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    I find loading 120 on to plastic reels a lot easier than 35mm. I don't unravel the whole film, but unwind until I find the film leader stuck to the backing paper. I tear the film off, leaving part of the tape stuck to the film, this gives it a stiffer leading edge. I hold the reel in my right hand, with my finger and thumb over the entry slots, and push the film in with my left (holding it at the edges). Once the ball-bearings are met, I hold the film and reel with my left, and pull the leader through the balls. Then it's just a question of cranking the spiral & unwinding the film from the paper in sections.

  8. #18
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    A few "tricks" you might find helpful. Assuming you use your left hand to hold and manipulate the reel, and your right hand to hold the film, try this. First, make sure the open end of the spiral on the SS reel faces to the right. Once the leading edge of the film is under the clip, use your left-hand thumb and middle finger to feel the centering of the film in the center of the reel, and reposition the film if needed. Then, make sure the film is clipped such that it's square to the reel. Try to keep a slight, even tension on the film as you rotate the reel, and rest your right-hand thumb and index finger, used to guide the film, on the edge of the reel. That will prevent having too much arc or "pinch" across the width of the film. You want just enough to clear the outer edge of the reel.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  9. #19

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    "It does have a metal spring clip so I assume you hook the end of the film and start spinning the reel hoping the film will wind up perfectly in its track."

    Good Morning, Christian,

    I don't know for sure about Adorama reels, but I have never encountered a reel with the center spring device (Nikkor-type) which actually "hooks" the film; instead, the end of the film is simply slid under the wire spring which is supposed to hold it, but does so far less effectively and reliably than the puncturing devices found on better-quality reels.

    You can use a paper punch to make a well-centered hole near the end of the film, then fabricate a small hook from very thin wire or a small paper clip. The film could then be "hooked" to the spring device, which procedure would probably result in the film's being relatively well-centered in the reel, which should, in turn, lead to easy loading. But all this is really unnecessary. Either top-quality reels and/or lots of practice with the cheaper kind should take care of your problem.

    Konical

  10. #20
    Daniel Lawton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip P. Dimor
    I can't load plastic reels with 120, be it Patterson or Generic.. I mean, I can get the film on there but I end up kinking the film pretty badly. I've smashed more than one reel before.. I'm thinking that high-humidity might have played a part in my troubles.
    Either that or gunked-up ball-bearings.

    I liked the jobo 120 reel, the real big/wide ones that also take 220 I think.
    Although I don't know if I was ever loading it properly; I just 'pushed' the film in. Worked well for me though.

    LOL! I have smashed two plastic reels in frustration over the last 5 months trying to load 120 on plastic reels. (35mm is no problem) I've used the generic brands and the Patterson super system and they were both an equally horrific experience. In fact I have NEVER successfully loaded 120 onto a plastic reel without creasing it or damaging the film in some way. By comparison I successfully loaded a SS reel after practicing for 10 min. Can't tell you why everyone here has had opposite experiences but it is pretty funny to read these comments.

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