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  1. #1
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    Ever see a grown man cry?

    I finally got a day to my self to go hiking and shoot some film. Everything was great, I was going to hike to one of my favorite waterfalls. I stopped on the way to shoot some great ice formations along a small cascade and that's when it happened. I forgot to secure a strap on my backpack and the zipper opened and BAM! my RB67 took a tumble onto a large boulder and into the stream. It was only in the water for 5-10 seconds, but the damage was done.

    My film back is toast, thats where it landed on the boulder. The lens has probably about a teaspoon of water in it, the body is a little wet inside, but not too bad, and the prism looks to have a little moisture in it. I can get a bargain grade ProS body from KEH for less than $100.

    My problem now is do I spend the money to fix the lens (if it can be fixed) and get the body looked at to make sure everything is ok? The prism looks to have a little moisture in it, but if the meter still works, I can live with that for a while. Any suggestions in my time of grief?
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  2. #2
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    That Sucks
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  3. #3
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    My condolences, sorry to hear this, I don't know if it worse to be able to recover it from the water, or to loose it forever, I lost a very expensive 35mm lens a few years ago, over the side in Yellowstone lake, so know what your feeling.

    Dave

  4. #4
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    Dave, I know what you mean. After recovering the camera, I sat down and disassembled the camera drying everything off as much as I could. It would almost be easier to have seen it go down the stream and over the falls. I was so upset that i never made it down to the waterfall. All I could think of was how I could have been so careless to not secure my backpack properly.

    To make things worse, a roll of film was in it and there was only one shot left. I don't know how it will turn out yet. I'll develop it tonight to see how it looks.
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Travis, I have been told by expert camera repair people that the best thing to do is to rinse the affected equipment with distilled water to remove all salts from the camera that were touched by the stream water. Otherwise, the salts can have a worsening effect as they stay in contact with the camera and lens.

    I don't know how much you should use, whether you should dunk it or what. I was told by one repair person that a soaking was needed with several changes of water if the camera landed in salt water, but I don't know the details of fresh water.

    Another thing that they told me is to not let the equipment dry out. Put it into a baggie without the batteries and keep it damp.

    I have never had the misfortune to need to test this advice, so I cannot speak to its accuracy. I suggest that you check this route out with a reputable camera repair person ASAP.

    PE

  6. #6
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Travis,
    We all take our beloved, expensive, sometimes irreplacable equipment into hostile environments where they can be damaged or stolen. If we didn't, so many beautiful, precious images would never be made. There are many stories similar to yours. Mine involves a Zeiss 28mm T* that was abruptlty introduced to a sidewalk while juggling primes. Don't beat yourself up about it. It is sad to lose a camera or lens but think of the wonderful images that would be lost if you kept that RB nice and safe in a closet.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  7. #7
    glbeas's Avatar
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    PE is right, dump the gear in a bag of distilled water and run to your repairman. If you get it done before any corrosion sets in it'll be fine. 'Cept for the back, RIP.
    Gary Beasley

  8. #8
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    Neal, you're right, I'll get over it when my gear is either fixed or replaced. I just got the RB recently and I've fallen in love with it. At least I didn't lose my whole backpack. I'd have lost my 127mm lens for the RB and my Canon EOS3 and 400mm lens.

    Gary, PE, thanks for the info. I have to wait until Monday to take the gear to a repair person. I think that for the money they cost I'll just get a new body. The lens, on the other hand, is a bit more so I'm going to take that to the repair guy.
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  9. #9

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    PE is right. Corrosion is the big enemy in the body. If corrosion doesn't set in, there is a good chance a good repairman can save the body. Last year I got caught in the rain with my Pentax 645. The prism got wet and became partially desilvered - it had to be replaced. If the lens drains decently, it may be possible to save it. I would worry about water marks on the coating and possible corrosion of the metal parts. Lens repairs are expensive when a complete realignment is needed, as is likely here.

  10. #10
    gnashings's Avatar
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    That really sucks - my sympathies. I recently had my gear stolen, so I feel for you. Its an empty feeling and a whole lot of "I should have...!" type thoughts. In my case, among the stolen equipment was a very nice "L" lens for my Canon FD's - the sad thing is, I got it by sheer dumb luck by trading a cheap lens for it at a pawn shop that basically sold lenses by the foot (long ones are worth more than short ones, long fat ones more than long skinny ones, etc) - Its waaaay out of my range to replace. Take some solace in the fact that you can at least salvage something out of this mishap.

    And you know... many people pre-soak films (this was meant to cheer you up, if it didn't please disregard!)

    Best of luck with this conundrum,

    Peter.

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