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  1. #21
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Fagan
    20 years ago when I bought my F3 20 years ago I decided to test the mirror lock up effectiveness.

    This was done with a tripod and a 55mm micro Nikkor lens.

    Shutter speed from memory, was either 1/15 or 1/4. I shot the standard for all camera lens tests, a sheet of newsprint.

    I then did enlargements equivilant to:- 8x10, 12x16 16x20 and finally 1 metre wide on the long side of the film.

    Film used was B&W 50 ASA.

    8x10" virtually no difference, from 12x16" upwards there was a noticeable difference. I remember the 1 metre wide being unuseable, whilst the mirror locked up exposure was useable, just.

    For practical purposes mirror lockup does help, so I use it on a tripod. The only time I use it hand held is with a 24mm wideangle, when I wish to remain as discreet as possible.

    Mick.
    In 1973, I preformed a test similar to the one Mick performed. Major differences in methodology were:

    1. Instead of testing the mirror lock-up feature, I was comparing the performance of two ASA 50 black & white films (H&W Control VTE and Kodak High Contrast Copy
    2. Instead of a Nikon F3, I was using a Nikon F2.
    3. Instead of the 55mm micro, I was using a 50mm f2 Nikkor.
    4. In addition to shooting with the mirror locked up and without the mirror locked up, I also tested with UV protective filter and without UV protective filter.

    My results were identical to Mick’s. At the higher enlargements, I too noticed better image quality with the mirror locked up. At the higher enlargements, I also noticed better image quality without the UV protective filter.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by xpista
    Could you share your personal experience with the "mirror lockup"? Are the pictures noticeably better (sharper) when the mirror is locked up?
    Very important with my Bronica...the mirror is so vigorous that I've nicknamed the camera 'Thunker' because the mirror goes 'thunk'!
    [FONT=Verdana][/FONT][COLOR=Black][/COLOR][SIZE=1]Snapper[/SIZE]

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenM
    For tripod exposures, I *always* use ML - why wouldn't I? Anything to reduce camera shake from mirror slap is a good thing.
    Same here. I use it all the time when shooting with the camera on a tripod. It gives the last bit of sharpness.

    Morten

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snapperlondon
    Very important with my Bronica...the mirror is so vigorous that I've nicknamed the camera 'Thunker' because the mirror goes 'thunk'!
    http://www.apug.org/forums/showthrea...highlight=daft
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  5. #25

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    I almost always use a very heavy tripod with my 35mm camera which in turn has a rope hanging from the center column to a foot pad that I step upon firmly with 100kg of weight and the mirror locked up.

    Zeiss on their website when discussing high resolution photography in their news letter Camera and Lens news has this to say. We know of no (SLR) camera that has mirror lock that does not need and we do not know any camera that does not offer it which would not benefit from it.

    Since to me composition is the most important element for me of the photograph I do not use mirror lock up in the few instances I use a hand held camera. I will when placing the camera on a bench or ledge, hold it in place and lock up the mirror locked before tripping the shutter.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  6. #26

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    A really easy way to check stability combinations is to mount(tape, rubber bands etc) a small mirror on the front of the lens/lens cap/camera you're checking.
    Mont to the tripod,point a light source at the mirror/camera so you have a reflected spot of light on the opposite wall. Trip the shutter & observe the projected light. This will give you some idea of how much vibration is present.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  7. #27

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    I was surprised to feel that my Olympus OM-1, with the mirror locked up, also had an issue with the camera body trying to "torque" around the shutter opening and closing action. Almost ALL of my SLRs have a highly notable reaction to mirror movement, my Minolta x-700 being one of the worst. The absolute "king of the hill" for reacting against the mirror is my Bronica S2a, while my Nikon N80 is probably the best for NOT reacting to mirror movement.

  8. #28
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    Handy thing to have. As I found out the first time I had my Mamiya 645 on a tripod. I had been using a Slick U-212 for my 35mm and 6x6 TLR shots and thought it stable enough for my needs. Of course the TLR has a leaf shutter(Rolleicord1V) and thus adds little vibration into the mix and the 35mm cameras were smaller and lighter. The first time I used it with the 645 I forgot to lock the mirror up and when I pressed the cable release the camera shook like a puppy happy to see its owner. I locked the mirror up for the next shot. Little difference. The plastic parts that make up the tripod head of the U-212 are not rigid enough for this type of shutter/camera combo. I pulled out the Bogen I use for my 4x5" and that took care of that. But I still use the mlu when using a tripod.
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  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer
    A really easy way to check stability combinations is to mount(tape, rubber bands etc) a small mirror on the front of the lens/lens cap/camera you're checking.
    Mont to the tripod,point a light source at the mirror/camera so you have a reflected spot of light on the opposite wall. Trip the shutter & observe the projected light. This will give you some idea of how much vibration is present.
    I did something similar when testing my Pentax 6X7/tripod/tripodhead combination. I mounted a Laserpointer on the lens pointed against a mirror projecting the dot on the wall just behind me (lightpath=20m). I tried my Mannfrotto 055 (2,6kg) and my 058 (approx 6kg) using the mannfrotto 141 head. There was a lot of mirror slap (approx 15mm) and some shutter slap(less than 5mm). I was surprised to see that it didn't matter which tripod I used butI also learned that the little plastic thing that I used instead of the centercolumn was ....... So now I'm planning to cut the centercolumn down to make lowangleshots possible with it. I will also drill a hole in it so I can use the looptechnique mentioned if needed.
    I draw some other conclusions but never mind.
    Cheers Søren
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