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  1. #11

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    I've got a 65, 127 and 250 and probably use the 65 most of all for landscapes. The 127 with an extension tube is my second favorite.

    Phil

  2. #12

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    Feb 2004
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    I only have the 90mm on my RB. I had the 127mm for a while, but found that it wasn't quite wide enough for my uses (close-up and landscape). My next lens will be the 65mm.

    My tripod is a Giottos MT9170 with an older Slik 3-way pan head on it. Many Giottos tripods have those nifty extension/boom arms that are great for lightweight 35mm cameras. Forget about using any such thing with cameras as heavy as the RB67!
    Jacob

  3. #13
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert8x10
    Just remember to use the Mirror-up for your RB. Theres nothing like the "Chur-Chunk" of the RB firing but it took me sometime to figure that mirror sure makes awhole lotta shaking and why my negs weren't sharp!
    Robert, there's probably something messed up in the centrifuge friction. The RB has counter-rotating masses and almost no mirror shake. That said, locking the mirror is always a good thing in critical situations.

    I currently have this setup: 50mm C, 127mm C, 180mm C, 360mm non-C.

    I can't say but good things about the 50mm (except distortion), absolutely of great use. I bought it to replace the 65mm which was "never enough" (as opposed to someone else said) and in my very humble opinion not sharp as such.

    Same thing for the 127mm, which replaced an older 90mm (I tend to prefer longer focal lenghts together with asymmetric design in the "normal" area. Though, the 90mm non-C was quite as good).

    I strongly suggest the 180mm instead of the 250mm, because having had one and having it used for portraits it requires unconvenient full bellows extension in most cases for head shots, and even more than that sometimes (children etc.)

    The 360mm is nothing special (probably because other factors are usually involved when taking photographs with such a long focal, like fog or shake) but it's a great thing to have such an amazing focal length available in mid format when you need it.

    Manfrotto 028 "Triman" with 229 head for me.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  4. #14

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    How do you do the mirror lockup on this thing? Is there a manual on line?
    thanks

  5. #15
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    You pull and turn the M/N knob on the lens' barrel. By triggering the shutter button, the mirror goes up but the shutter won't move. At this point, you can fire the shutter with a standard cable screwed in the M/N knob.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  6. #16

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    Sep 2003
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    Central Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Gilardetti
    You pull and turn the M/N knob on the lens' barrel. By triggering the shutter button, the mirror goes up but the shutter won't move. At this point, you can fire the shutter with a standard cable screwed in the M/N knob.
    There used to be manuals online at www.mamiya.com/customerservice1.asp?id=3&id2=115

    I know the Pro-S & Pro-SD were there.
    JeffW.

  7. #17
    Mongo's Avatar
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    Jan 2004
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    Regarding lenses, my favorite RB lens is the 140 macro. I find that it's excellent at just about everything that I want out of a longer lens, and it's fantastic up close. (Hint: leave the floating element at infinity when you're shooting portraits for a touch of soft-focus at the edges of the frame...not enough to overwhelm the image, but just enough to nudge the eye back to the portrait itself.)

    For a tripod I use the Berlebach 4032 (the one with the integrated levelling ball head). It's not as light as a modern carbon fiber tripod, but it's the same tripod that I use for my 8x10 C1, so it's more than enough tripod for the RB. Given that the RB isn't a light camera, carrying a few extra pounds of tripod doesn't seem to be that big of a deal to me. I love working with a wooden tripod for the way it handles vibrations, and the Berlebach has been a real winner for me. (Plus it's reasonably priced...never a bad thing.)
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  8. #18

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    Sep 2005
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    near Ottawa, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mongo
    Regarding lenses, my favorite RB lens is the 140 macro. I find that it's excellent at just about everything that I want out of a longer lens, and it's fantastic up close.
    I can only echo that - the 140 is certainly the jewel in their lineup. My lenses for the RB include a 65, 90, 140, and 250. Granted, the 250 was more of an impulse buy and its implications not really thought through (read - it needs LOTS of space for anything other than very tight head shots).
    [SIZE=1]Tiptoeing through life's grand theater - and falling down flat.[/SIZE]

  9. #19
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Gilardetti
    You pull and turn the M/N knob on the lens' barrel. By triggering the shutter button, the mirror goes up but the shutter won't move. At this point, you can fire the shutter with a standard cable screwed in the M/N knob.
    dont forget to put it back when you return to N (normal) shooting ! I did this once, and once only :rolleyes:

    the RZ has a better system which I actually shoot - in terms of lenses I have the RZ 50mm, 110mm and the 180mm ...

    I know you can get 50mm and 180mm in the RB range - both good - the 110mm is the fastest in the RZ range, not sure if there is an RB version tho - I like them all and tend to rotate them and appropriate subjects on a regular basis
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  10. #20
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nick mulder
    dont forget to put it back when you return to N (normal) shooting ! I did this once, and once only :rolleyes:
    Now, that's a good hint indeed!
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

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