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  1. #11
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    And let's not forget that obscure 120 camera (the name has escaped me at the moment) that uses half-frame (cropped top and bottom) on the 6x6 track to give 24 3x4 exposures -- similar frame size to 127 half frame, but oriented sidewise on the 120 roll.

    And if you can ever find one, a 6x23 will give 3 exposures on a 120 roll. I'm working on building a pair (for pinhole)...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  2. #12

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    I have an AGFA isolette L which is able to shoot 6x6 and 6x3 (60mmx30-32mm). For those who want to know more about it: it uses a mask attached to the camera, has a viewfinder correction, double exposure prevention and even has a light meter (which works on my example).

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by david b
    What cameras, aside from Fuji, are 6x8 ?
    I think there was a 6x8 back made for the RB pro-S.

  4. #14

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    645 = 16 shots
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Or 15 shots. The older Pentax 645 is 15 IIRC. The newer models 16.
    My Mamiya M645 exposes only 15 shots too...

  5. #15
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Well, don't forget some of the earlier Ziess 6x6 folders with automatic frame counters got only 11 on a roll, too.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  6. #16
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wimpler
    I have an AGFA isolette L which is able to shoot 6x6 and 6x3 (60mmx30-32mm). For those who want to know more about it: it uses a mask attached to the camera, has a viewfinder correction, double exposure prevention and even has a light meter (which works on my example).
    Is that a factory job? I've seen (pictures of) a couple of the older bakelite-top Isolettes that could do both 6x6 and 6x4.5, with three windows (one in center for 6x6, two on the 6x9 track for 6x4.5, since 120 didn't reliably have 16-on framing tracks when those came out) -- but I've never seen or heard of an Isolette that could do narrower frames. It'd be an easy conversion, as such things go; masks that pivot on the pin rollers and store in the film compartments, and a little rotating mask in the viewfinder, plus a second window at the takeup edge of the frame gate. It wasn't particularly uncommon to see cameras converted to conserve film in the years just after WWII.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    It'd be an easy conversion, as such things go; masks that pivot on the pin rollers and store in the film compartments, and a little rotating mask in the viewfinder, plus a second window at the takeup edge of the frame gate.
    It was certainly a factory job as every isolette L has it. But it is pretty much as you thought it would be. Except for the fact that it has 1 single red window for film numbers. I'v seen instructions on the net on how to advance properly for the smaller format using the dots between the numbers on the paper back.

    It has a top plate specifically made for the camera with a lever to flip the viewfinder mask.

  8. #18
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Very interesting, Wimpler. I'd measure those mask flaps -- they're more likely to be for 6x4.5 than 6x3, and your camera probably has had the back switched. The Isolette model that had the 6x4.5 masks and VF mask had two windows, one in the center at one at the bottom (for the 6x4.5 track that was on all all 120 film by 1953 or so). These were all Bakelite top plate cameras, AFAIK...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  9. #19

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    http://www.photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-...?msg_id=007TC4

    McKeown is wrong about it

    I am pretty damn sure it really is a factory job and that everything stated otherwise is coming from a guide that is wrong.

    I did find a website on the insolette L somewhere but can't find it anymore. I did measure the flaps myself and it is 60mm x 30-32 mm

  10. #20
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Cool. Still not sure I understand the usefulness of a 6x3 frame, other than to save film, and I *really* don't get why they wouldn't at least give a dual window (that other 4x3 on 120 camera gives that; advance like 6x4.5 in a masked 6x9).

    And this is *vertical*? Very, very strange...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

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