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  1. #21
    gnashings's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande
    Exactly! I don't think that if anyone that is happy with their 35mm work is going to care how I feel about it, but personally I am all thumbs and I am not a careful worker. I had tons of trouble getting the 35mm on the reels, and 120 was a piece of cake. Maybe 35mm just doesn't like me.
    Nah, you were just meant for bigger, better things!

  2. #22

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    I certainly hope that no one read my message in this thread as "my format is better than yours." I use medium format extensively, and also LF and ULF. I also use point and shoot medium format (Fuji GA645Zi) as well as the plain Jane rangefinder 6X9 Fujis (GW and GSW 690II cameras), and medium format SLR (primarily for close-up work and long telephoto work). They all have their place, though in many instances one of these has a better place than the others, and the plain fact is that sometimes one of these cameras will "beat up" the other in a specific type of shooting situation.

    Same is true of LF and ULF equipment.

    I don't use 35mm except for snapshots because I simply don't find it possible to get the kind of quality I want from this format in prints larger than 5X7. If you can do better, more power to you. But you can bet that if I were doing wildlife or sports photography for a living you would find me with a 35mm camera and a bunch of long lenses.

    Bottom line, choose your equipment based on the type of photography you do, and in accord with the final product.

    Sandy




    Quote Originally Posted by gnashings
    If I didn't read very carefully, I would think that we had a "my dad can beat up your dad" thread vis a vis various formats
    There is a certain best of both worlds quality to MF (which kind of goes along with the term "medium" in the name) - I know that the first time I saw a MF negative, I was so blown away, I wondered why anyone would shoot 35mm. But then novelty wore off (but not he magic!), and now the formats all peacfully co-exist, each with a strong point to more than justify its existance.
    And then there is the fact that the bigger the format, the more beautiful and enchanting the camera! And I know, its just a tool to many, but to me, a largepart of the enjoyment comes from all that gorgeous, unique looking equipment!

    Peter.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Satinsnow
    I agree with Ralph, all of the formats have there place as long as you learn how to exploit the strong points of the format..

    Dave
    Dave, since you were so clear and are such an all-round good guy, I'm going to take the terrible risk of disagreeing with you.

    I moved up from 35 mm to 2x3 because there I saw no other way to get a closeup shot of a flower in its natural setting with good detail in the flower (can require ~ 1:1) and enough of the setting in the frame (not much fits 24 x 36 at 1:1). In some situations, 4x5 would be even better but I'm not ready for that yet.

    Cheers,

    Dan

  4. #24
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm
    Dave, since you were so clear and are such an all-round good guy, I'm going to take the terrible risk of disagreeing with you.

    I moved up from 35 mm to 2x3 because there I saw no other way to get a closeup shot of a flower in its natural setting with good detail in the flower (can require ~ 1:1) and enough of the setting in the frame (not much fits 24 x 36 at 1:1). In some situations, 4x5 would be even better but I'm not ready for that yet.

    Cheers,

    Dan
    Dan,

    Disagreeing is fine,,

    As you saw, that particular instance is not one of the strong points of 35mm hence you have to move up to a larger size to give you more image area..

    Dave

  5. #25
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    My experience is a bit different than that of most of the others who have posted. When I started out in photography my choice was 4x5, 5x7, or 8x10.
    The only 35mm films were cassettes filled with the ends of movie film and though some fairly good, did not approch 4x5 quality for professional use. Studio photographers used pretty much 8x10 and ocassionally larger for portraits.

    Product photography was done with 8x10 as the standard, with 5x7 and 4x5 dead even at second choice. 5x7 was seldom a first choice for the news photographers, however the sports camera men loved it. They lugged their gear into Yankee Stadium and set up anywhere except on the playing field.
    10 feet from home plate was fine. The majority of pressmen were using 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 or 4x5.

    The 6x6 6x9 was seldom used by the sports photographer due to the lack of interchangable lenses. 75mm to 85mm worked wonders for the guys doing news and daily work, but didn't cut it for sports. 35mm then greatly updated entered the scene with cameras, lenses and a bunch of pretty darn good films to choose from. You know the rest of the story.

    So, I started with LF and went with the flow to 35mm. At one time in my life 95% of the advertising photographs I made were with 35mm. Did it compare to any of the larger formats? No way! 35mm and the quality associated with it was the editors choice. (Quick and Dirty) It did not take too many years for the tide to change back to the larger formats for professional quality reproduction.. I have personally earned my total income directly from using the above mentioned tools for my working lifetime. I have come to believe that there is no one perfect format! They all have their pluses and minuses. A person must make his choice of format then live within it's boundrys.

    I personally can't make such a choice, as I can readily see the advantages of all the formats. I make my selection based totally on how I can best deliver the highest and best quality images to my customer. Pick out what you like and learn to wring out the best possible images from it. Then close your ears to any one disagreeing with your choice. You are the only one who can choose "your" perfect format! So pick one and "damn the torpedos full speed ahead"

    Charlie.........................

    Unfortunitly my Daddy can't beat up your Daddy, though I truly wish he were here to toss one more fly in the Gunnison River.............

  6. #26
    Buster6X6's Avatar
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    It is amazing how Internet has influenced spread of LF in North America and the World.
    I started with photography in late sixties with a 35mm snap shutter and interest in super 8 movie productions. I was looking at the Hasselblad and said I will own one one day. Thirty years later I have two. But really I had not a clue that LF even existed. There was not much edvertising for LF . Maybe because I was in Europe. When we moved to Canada I bought 35MM AE1 in 79 not knowing any better.(I wish I had APUG then) and I used it till 99. The ball started rolling when friend of mine gave me 4X5 Crown Graphic. Size did matter, huge negatives(vis a vis 35mm). I fell in love. Then 2004 I met APUG and the whole new world opened up for me. After I got Green Monster from Jim I newer looked back. My world is spinning, my enthusiasm is back. I can't wait to log on to learn new things, or go out and mesmerize people on the street, What is this guy doing with the big box. And I know I am here to stay.

    Long live large format photography
    Greg
    Looking is a gift, but seeing is power.

    Buster6X6

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