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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by digiconvert
    Sorry if I gave that impression. I would use the same meter in whichever mode seemed appropriate, a landscape might need reflected but a still life in the studio might need incident- is that about it ?

    Cheers CJB
    Hi Digi...

    I use both reflective and incident.

    I generally use reflective readings when doing B&W landscapes or similar work and always when metering using the Zone System. For this I use a Pentax V with a 1 degree spot, metering for the shadows and closing down two stops I never have a problem (well only very occassionally).

    With portraiture, studio and still life (studio again) I would use incident light and for this I have a Sekonic L508, again I dont experience any problems with exposure.

    Both meters read in Exposure Values (EV's) which are so easy to determine contrast ranges in a scene.

    With colour landscapes I use both but the important thing about using an incident meter you have to be in the same light as the object you are metering, so again spot metering is ideal for this. If I use spot for colour trannies I tend to bracket as well because I'm hopeless at determining a middle grey in a colour landscape scene, this does generally work, but also get a good few failures.

    I hope this helps.

    Cheers

    John

  2. #12

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    I mostly use incident metering in and out of a studio. You'll never see a movie lighting crew caught without one. For me it's the surest way to determine lighting ratio's and real exposure differences without hunting for a medium subject tone. Overall it's really just a fancy gray card.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider
    Overall it's really just a fancy gray card.
    This is interesting because I like to think of a grey card and reflected light meter toghether as just a fancy incident meter.

  4. #14

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    I think reflective meters, especially spot meters, are best used with the Zone system, or at least a half-hearted attemp at it. Otherwise, your reading off one place in the scene is insufficient to get a good overall exposure without taking into account the placement of that value and your anticipated development. Wayne is so right in saying an incident is a fancy gray card. And you could take a gray card with you into the field and meter off of it to get a fairly accurate general exposure. Pointing a wide field reflective meter at a scene gets you close, but if you point a little too much toward the sky or the ground, it gets dicey. If I had to choose one and only one, it would be incident.
    Robert Hunt

  5. #15
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    Does anyone use the flat incident collectors that some meters come with?
    Instead of reading and combining the light and shadow that is hitting a dome which is most convenient in most situations, it is more akin to reading off a flat grey card. Great for reading lighting ratios and copy work.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

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