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  1. #1

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    satin snow 6x7 opinions

    Hi everyone,
    I own a pentax 6x7 and because the groundglass is somewhat dim, i am thinkning of replacing it with a brighter one.
    I came across beattie off course, but they are expensive. Too expensive simply. Satin snow on the other hand is very very cheap. They make a ground glass for as less as 9 dollar.
    Is satin snow also a bright screen? brighter than the standard screen from pentax 6x7? Or is all of this bullshit?
    Can I easily replace it myself? should I let pro do it?
    Some question that circulate in my mind right now....

    Love to hear some statements here...
    Best regards Sam

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Well,

    I don't think my screens are Bullshit, but someone out there might! Our screens are not considered a "Brightscreen" brightscreens are a different type of technology and encompass fresnels, sandwich screens and such, we are a true handground fine grained focus screen, custom made to the specifications of the customers needs, it has been a long time since I looked through a 67 so I would have to let someone else answer as far as brightness in that particular application.



    Dave

  3. #3
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satinsnow
    Well,

    I don't think my screens are Bullshit, but someone out there might! Our screens are not considered a "Brightscreen" brightscreens are a different type of technology and encompass fresnels, sandwich screens and such, we are a true handground fine grained focus screen, custom made to the specifications of the customers needs, it has been a long time since I looked through a 67 so I would have to let someone else answer as far as brightness in that particular application.



    Dave
    Dave is of course, as usual, modest about his product. I replaced the fresnel in my 4x5 with a satin snow, and while I would not consider it significantly brighter than the fresnel, (I do not miss the localised brightening of the image that is part of the fresnel effect, I actually find it distracting, however, some people might like it. It's probably not an issue on 67 anyway) The image is very much clearer, and the "seeing" is much more akin to the light I will be exposing the film to. Dave makes a fine GG.

    I am sure that deep in the underground Satin Snow labs in Kalispell, Dave is perfecting a WYSIWYG glass, that will turn the photo world upside down.

  4. #4
    roteague's Avatar
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    It is good glass, I have one on my 4x5. I can't tell you about the 6x7 glass though. I can also tell you that Satin Snow (aka Dave) is an great fellow, always willing to go out of his way to help others.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #5

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    Just a word of caution when replacing the ground glass on a 67. Unlike many 35mm systems where it is a simple matter to swap out one style for another, it is a little more complex with the 67. The manufacturer recommends having it done by a professional.

    If my memory serves me, the gg rests on spring clips inside its frame, and the four strange screws (which require something like a miniature spanner wrench to adjust) secure it in place and are used to precisely adjust the position of the gg. The reason I am familiar with this is I did it once years ago, carelessly so, and for awhile the images I thought were in focus were not. It took my setting up the camera with a tape measure and newsprint target to finally get it right.

    Having swapped out the gg for a brighter one, I would never consider going back.

  6. #6
    hortense's Avatar
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    It's the best choice you could make. Had the same problem that JBrunner had with the bightened spot on the Iintenscree.
    [FONT=Times New Roman]MAC[/FONT]

  7. #7

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    You can make a glass your self fairly easily if you good with your hands. a friend of mine did it for his 4x5 and it came out really well. There are several articles on the net that go through detailed instructions but the basic technique is to rub 2 peaces of glass together with a good rubbing compound in between. If you use to fine of compound nothing will happen and to rough it will chip the glass. you also have to be careful of scratching the glass. Its a fun project if you have some time and want to experiment.

  8. #8
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by asaphoto
    You can make a glass your self fairly easily if you good with your hands. a friend of mine did it for his 4x5 and it came out really well. There are several articles on the net that go through detailed instructions but the basic technique is to rub 2 peaces of glass together with a good rubbing compound in between. If you use to fine of compound nothing will happen and to rough it will chip the glass. you also have to be careful of scratching the glass. Its a fun project if you have some time and want to experiment.
    Yes, you can, Large format glass is pretty easy, of course those of us that do ground glass have our own proprietory methods for making it, Medium Format is a little different story, rubbing compound is just about the worst material you can use to grind glass, yes it will frost the glass, but you will embed grease which is used for a float material into the open pours of the glass, as the photography business is full of adventure, I encourage everyone to do it, experimentation has raised us to the current level we are at, if you happy with what you can make that is great, and if I can ever answer any questions, please don't hesitate to drop me a note, I am always willing to help.

    Dave Parker
    Satin Snow Ground Glass



 

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