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Thread: YashicaMat 124G

  1. #21
    AZLF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulownian
    It appears that I have fallen into a snake pit of Yashica-loving, Hasselblad-bashing, non-wedding-shooting-for-a-loving, argumentative "photographers". I said that the 124G was a nice little camera, but if any of you think that it can handle the daily rigors of commercial photographic life, then you are in a fantasy world where you believe yourselves to be photographers who are watching real photographers through the looking glass. Jump out of the rabbit hole and take a few hundred actuations, or perhaps a few thousand, per week (day?), and see who the clear winner is. It's the same difference as between a Lincoln LS and a crappy Japanese import. The import may look good to a rave crowd at a street race. But, if your family, your house, your college loan payments, your car payment, your daughter's dental health all depend on what you bring home from photography, then you don't shoot weddings with a 124G! Get real; get a real photography job; and a real camera!

    My Yashica 124 survived a year of field duty while I was working as a photographer for the 25th Infantry Div. in Cu Chi,Viet Nam (1969/70). It got dropped more than once, rained on countless times and never failed me.We also had Leica M3's and Graflex XL systems available.But they were rarely used because they did not survive the rigors of the field as well. You seem to be mixing up the words "cheap" and "inexpensive". The Yashica is the latter, not the former.

    Further, years later a commercial photographer I worked with who could afford any gear he wished dumped his entire hassy system for a Mamiya 645 system because he could not depend on the shutters in the hassy lenses.They were spending more time in service than in the field or studio.
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  2. #22

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    I have several Mamiya products, including the entire TLR line. They are good cameras. I bought my first one back in the day ('67).

    I don't spend anymore time in maintenance than any good photographer would. Just as I take my vehicle for regular tuneups, I take my cameras in for regular CLA. I haven't replaced much beyond seals, and other minor parts since I began using Hasselbads. Even my lenses only have required minor replacements over the decades.

    I shoot weddings and portraits; therefore, I want the negative to be crystal sharp and softened at my decision. I use multiple lenses on a single body, and multiple backs. I can't stop shooting to reload in many cases.

    I have a great job, son. I also have many, many years, in military and government service, I've lived and traveled the entire world, I have 3 college degrees, I've worked in photography since I was a teenager in the mid-'60's, and I have a business contracting wedding, portrait, and commercial work to other studios and businesses.

  3. #23

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    Paul

    Are you saying that images from a Yashica-mat are not sharp enough for your purpuses? How much do you enlarge?

  4. #24
    b1bmsgt's Avatar
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    Since this was my thread to begin with, I thought I would chime in here...

    Sold my $22 124G the other day on eBay for $152! Turned around and picked up 2 124's for about $40 each. One is a fixer upper and the other is perfect, including the meter. The all black 124G is OK, but I decided I like the classic styling of the 124 and earlier models better. I use a handheld meter anyway, so the gold contacts in the G don't make any difference to me.
    I also mave a Yashica Mat and a Yashica D sitting on the shelf, but I haven't tried them out yet.

    Sounds like a touch of GAS, doesn't it?


    Russ
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  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by paulownian
    I have a great job, son. I also have many, many years, in military and government service, I've lived and traveled the entire world, I have 3 college degrees, I've worked in photography since I was a teenager in the mid-'60's, and I have a business contracting wedding, portrait, and commercial work to other studios and businesses.
    That's real cool, daddy. Maybe you will allow others to have their experiences as well as you have had yours.

    As much as I respect your portfolio, I think there's room for other interpretations of what is acceptable in any one application.

  6. #26

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    If you know anything at all about economics, son, it is that the market determines all in the business world. You, as the artist, may enjoy the shit out of one particular tool of the trade, while, on the other hand, your clients require, and pay you to use another. Reality is a bitch, isn't it, little one.

    As I said before, I love my little 124G - I just don't rely on it to make my living.

  7. #27

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    If you know anything at all about economics, son, it is that the market determines all in the business world. You, as the artist, may enjoy the shit out of one particular tool of the trade, while, on the other hand, your clients require, and pay you to use another. Reality is a bitch, isn't it, little one.

    As I said before, I love my little 124G - I just don't rely on it to make my living.

  8. #28
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    I've casually used Yashica TLRs for 30+ years. When they work, they make good images. My Leica and Nikon 35mm gear has been much more reliable. The first Yashica TLR I considered buying, maybe a model D or 635, had seen so much use that it had heavy brassing and worn knurling, but still seemed to function well. Some Yashicas give great service, some don't. My Seagull doesn't work, either.

  9. #29

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    Yeah, free market...

    Like all those US Corporations, propped up on fat government subsidies...

    A little patriot welfare anyone?

    But we digress from the topic.

    Later gramps

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by paulownian
    If you know anything at all about economics, son, it is that the market determines all in the business world. You, as the artist, may enjoy the shit out of one particular tool of the trade, while, on the other hand, your clients require, and pay you to use another. Reality is a bitch, isn't it, little one.

    As I said before, I love my little 124G - I just don't rely on it to make my living.
    Jesus, for the third time...

    Is the problem simply that you can't show off with a yashica as you can with a hassie, or is there something wrong with the lens on the yashica that prevents you from using it for your work?

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