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  1. #21
    Trask's Avatar
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    Here's something else you can try. Get a Rolleiflex or Rolleicord that has a replaceable hood, and find a collapsible Rollei hood that permit both eye-level viewing through the hood AND uses the mirror inside the hood itself to permit eye-level focusing of the image. If you've not see one of these hoods, when erected you can push down the front of the hood and latch it at around a 45 degree angle. Pushing down the front creates a direct-view frame that you can use to aim the camera, and directly below the rear viewing hole of the direct-view frame is a second, magnifying viewer that permits you to focus the image on the groundglass via the reflected image on the latched-down front door of the hood (whew!).

    I just went up to Damascus from Amman last weekend, and after debating about all the various combinations of Leicas, Nikons, Canons, Contaxes, etc I could take, I decided to give it a shot with just my Rolleicord with this style hood (that I pulled from my Rolleiflex). Ok, it's not as quick as a Leica, but I found I can focus quite quickly (you're really focusing on a central detail, not viewing the entire frame through that magnifier), then slide my eye up about one inch to the open-frame finder. There's no more brilliant image than what you get by looking directly as the subject with only air in between. Yes, the framing of the open-frame finder is not parallax corrected, and the image that's recorded on the film is actually a bit wider than what you see in the finder, but that's of little consequence when you're working in 6X6. (Or maybe it's because I was using a hood from a Rolleiflex that has an 80mm lens, while the Rolleicord has a 75mm Xenar.) And boy is that shutter quiet -- a Leica is thunderous in comparison to the soft click of the Synchro Compur.

    So with a Rollei TLR with this hood, you've got a quiet 6X6 camera (admittedly with fixed lens), with eyelevel viewing that correct left/right. Lenses are first rate. And while many people that you're photographing will immediately react when they see the obvious non-native move his hand to his eye with a 35mm camera, if you choose to use the Rollei in its TLR mode, people often won't recognize what you're doing.

    One last thing: my Rolleicord Vb has the EV system built into the shutter speed/aperture interlock, and for the first time I thought to switch my exposure meter to EV mode, and simple transfer the number to the Rollei. Then I can move the EV handle on the lens around to any ss/aperture combination that pleases me. It's much easier than metering in ss/aperture, and it's only taken me 38 years of photography to figure this out! Imagine what new things I'll have figured out by the time I'm 80!

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by jshelly
    I'm still experimenting with different formats and cameras, and after using an M6 and a Rolleiflex Iíve come to the conclusion that I really enjoy medium format as well as using a rangefinder.

    The issues that I have with both, are that I find the TLR awkward to handle and the reverse directions composing has caused me to miss a shot on more then one occasion. With the Leica the main issue is that itís almost too small in my hands even though I have small hands, I always feels like Iím going to drop it even with a grip and the fact that itís 35mm.

    Iím contemplating on possibly selling the Rollei and M6 and purchasing a Mamiya 7II

    My main concern is only the limit of f4 with the Mamiya at this point, since I only use a standard lens (50mm or 80mm for medium). The Rollei can produce some amazing shots with a 3d look that I would hate to miss also.

    Is there anyone that has been in the same boat that could share some info? Has the limitation of f4 ever been an issue? Also, would there be any suggestions to something other then the Mamiya 7II?

    Thanks,
    I have owned both and have an interesting story. A couple of years ago I was in Italy for about a week or so and took my Mamiya 7 with a 50 mm lens and my Rolleiflex 3.5 F with a Zeiss Planar. The Rollei is 35 years old in excellent condition and the Mamiya was 6 months old. On the trip the shutter in the Mamiya failed. (a $500 repair) The Rollei worked flawlessly. Upon arriving home I printed Cibachromes from the film using my usual masking. I found the contrast in the Mamiya lenses to be so high that there was always a hard edge to the feel of the print while the prints from the Rollei had many more tones and colors to them and were more sensual. The resolution from both cameras were the same. I found the Mamiya to be easy to use and well designed though not quite as fine as the Rolleiflex. I sold the Mamiya after the repair as I can't use equipment that isn't reliable. After more years of working with the Rolleiflex I have found it to one of the finest cameras I used having shot all formats for many years. I don't think there is much of a comparison as the simplicity of the Rolleiflex and fine optics make it my choice.
    Good luck.
    Dennis

  3. #23
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Prism finder

    Quote Originally Posted by jshelly
    I'm still experimenting with different formats and cameras, and after using an M6 and a Rolleiflex Iíve come to the conclusion that I really enjoy medium format as well as using a rangefinder.

    The issues that I have with both, are that I find the TLR awkward to handle and the reverse directions composing has caused me to miss a shot on more then one occasion. With the Leica the main issue is that itís almost too small in my hands even though I have small hands, I always feels like Iím going to drop it even with a grip and the fact that itís 35mm.

    Iím contemplating on possibly selling the Rollei and M6 and purchasing a Mamiya 7II

    My main concern is only the limit of f4 with the Mamiya at this point, since I only use a standard lens (50mm or 80mm for medium). The Rollei can produce some amazing shots with a 3d look that I would hate to miss also.

    Is there anyone that has been in the same boat that could share some info? Has the limitation of f4 ever been an issue? Also, would there be any suggestions to something other then the Mamiya 7II?

    Thanks,
    You could try to get the prism finder for your Rollei, if you are having problems with the laterally reversed screen image, I use one with my Mamiya TLRs and its fine.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 05-10-2006 at 09:12 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: error

  4. #24
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bentley Boyd
    You could try to get the prism finder for your Rollei, if you are having problems with the laterally reversed screen image, I use one with my Mamiya TLRs and its fine.
    Bentley,

    That is a good point that I brought up on the first page of this thread.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  5. #25
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Sorry Richard , I must have missed that.

  6. #26
    Mike Kovacs's Avatar
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    My Rolleiflex 2.8E is my "go to" camera. I took one on a business trip two weeks ago - all 36 shots of Reala 100 look great. More than half are worth showing off IMO. I have a hard time taking bad photos with this camera. It was really my first serious MF as well, and though I have added quite a few more, I keep coming back to it.

    Don't let it go - you can handhold a Rollei better than a Mamiya RF. You can brace it against things and see what you are shooting in the WLF. I shot dozens of dimly lit church interiors in Europe using this technique. The Xenotar 80/2.8 lens is as sharp as the Planar 80/2.8 on my SL66 but the camera is *MUCH* easier to carry and shoot hand-held with, plus no mirror slap.

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