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  1. #1

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    Exposing polaroid

    Now and then I shoot polaroid film with my polaroid back on Bronica EC. I have the impression that exposure has to be acurate to get a good well exposed print. Not so forgiving as negative film.

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Yes, it's like slide film in that way. If you want to use it as a proofing medium, you should run some tests to see how it corresponds to the film you are shooting. Color Polaroid films are also more sensitive to reciprocity issues than most slide or print films, so they are most effective for proofing in situations where you are using strobes or a short exposure.
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  3. #3

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    I also found a performance difference using type 669 or type 690. It seems that 690 can be left to sit longer without much alteration on the results. Proofing seems much easier when you don't have to be so close on the timing of peeling the Polaroid apart. Some of the B/W Polaroid choices also seem better behaving at longer developing times.

    Ciao!

    Gordon

  4. #4

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    For Polacolor ER, can the shift to cyan in long exposures be partially compensated by developing time/temperature? I am using 10 sec. exposures for pinhole, so the reciprocity/colour shift is pretty dramatic. Has anyone used very short developing times or high temperature short developing (with adjusted exposure)? I realize this is a bit extreme.

    Cheers,
    Clarence

  5. #5

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    I see some of the effects of short developing when I do Polaroid manipulations, though that is only with type 669 and type 690. Partially there is less Cyan, but I don't know what to suggest to be consistent with that. I definitely have less trouble with that during warmer conditions, so perhaps experimenting with temperatures might be better than trying short duration. When I use Polaroids for proofing, I often leave the times long, hence my preference for type 690 film.

    Ciao!

    Gordon



 

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