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  1. #11
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    I was really happy with my RB67 until Patrick started talking about cameraleather.com. Now I want to get mine recovered, too. Thanks a lot Patrick ;-) The Indian Red is really sharp, but I also like the Granite.

    I have the 65, 90 and 180 lenses (all C lenses). I had the 127 originally, but it was always either a bit too wide or too long for my taste. The decision to get the 90 was made for me when I dropped the 127 and it had to be replaced.

    I've said it before in a few other threads, but I'll say it here again. RB67's were not made to go underwater. Just a little helpful advice.........
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  2. #12
    snegron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatist
    Snegron, here are a couple recent threads that might be of interest to you:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum51/27838-new-me-rb67-questions.html

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum51/27426-more-gas-mamiya-rb67-symptoms.html

    Travis & I have had a few exchanges there, and agree on the fact that this is one of the most versitile and hot value MF camera's out there. I am astonished at the sheer number of items that are available for them on eBay any given day. Give it 12 hours, and several dozen more are listed. Great values, wide variety.

    Try the left grip. It has a shutter release button, and a shoe for flash or accessories. In one of the threads, I have posted a picture of my Gossen Digiflash meter anchored to it. Very convenient, even more so than a metered prism. Mine came with a non-metered series II and a magnifier. Great stuff for tripod use. You may find that the waist level finder or a chimney is more suited to handheld use.

    An optech B strap is a great help too. The leatherette does shrink somewhat. Mark at Cameraleather.com has a wide variety of materials to replace with, although they do not have an already cut kit. I am measuring mine out, and can provide a little later the dimensional sizes of sheet necessary for recovering. In the alternate, you can send him your camera body and he will do it for you. I am going to recover mine in an Indian Red kid skin. Should look super sharp when done.

    The C series lens is multi-coated, while the regular Mamiya Sekor is single coated. Not too great of an issue with BW, and a lens hood to cut down on spurious light sources. A Hoya multicoated UV filter is a big help with this also, and provides much protection for the lens. Stay away from the Green series, for it will cut about 15% of your transmitted light out. Also, try to shoot for the SD series film backs. They do not use the foam seal system the others do, and are of a better and lighter design. The oldest series, while cheaper (Pro, and newer Pro S) require the foam seals and they get really gummy in time. Unless you are reasonably good at such things, its not worth the hassle in savings.

    I just noticed the gummy seals on the film backs. Does this mean that unwanted light will get into the film back or does this mean that the film back is not as well weather sealed as it should?

    I finally got my film back from the lab. This was my first time shooting 6x7 frames and I was impressed! I did notice a couple of things though. First was user error on my part, I double exposed one shot because I forgot to rewind the film advance lever on the film back after cocking the shutter. I did notice something strange though. I loaded film in each of the two film backs and I noticed that there appeared to be light streaks on two frames. These light streaks were vertical and were on the left side of two frames. They were only visible on one roll of film. I am sure it was not done prior to or while loading the film into the film back. I wonder if that particular film back has a problem with stray light comming into it through one of the gummy seals? The damaged frames were not next to each other and I did not rotate the back before or after any of the shots. The stray light is about half an inch wide and runs vertical.

    I was also very happy to see how sharp the images were! I will be shooting a few more rolls tomorrow to do more testing with this RB.

  3. #13
    Mongo's Avatar
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    When you say that the streaks are "vertical", do you mean they run vertically in the image? Also, which way was the back oriented when you shot those frames...that is, are they vertical images or horizontal images?
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  4. #14
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Though accidents may happen, the rubber seals are OK most of the times. The weak point is the seal along the hinge of the back (engineers were probably drunk when they draw that stupid thing without a light trap). Inspect it: it should be made with a strip of sponge, but after some years it turns into a black glueey blob. In case, have it replaced with a (far better and long lasting) black velvet seal.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  5. #15
    snegron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Gilardetti
    Though accidents may happen, the rubber seals are OK most of the times. The weak point is the seal along the hinge of the back (engineers were probably drunk when they draw that stupid thing without a light trap). Inspect it: it should be made with a strip of sponge, but after some years it turns into a black glueey blob. In case, have it replaced with a (far better and long lasting) black velvet seal.

    There is only what appears to be a strip of flat gummy substance where the hinge is. How do I replace the gooey stuff with a black velvet seal? Where can I get a velvet seal?

    I appears that both of my film backs have that gummy substance instead of a seal.

  6. #16
    snegron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mongo
    When you say that the streaks are "vertical", do you mean they run vertically in the image? Also, which way was the back oriented when you shot those frames...that is, are they vertical images or horizontal images?
    The streaks run vertically on the image. The image was shot with the back in horizontal mode. My guess is that the streak was caused by a bad seal near the hinged side of the film back. Problem is that it only apperas on two frames.

  7. #17
    Mongo's Avatar
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    Unfortunately it would be hard to replicate everything that happened with the film and camera as you were exposing it, but is it possible that those two frames were taken after you had moved to a new location or after you'd rotated the back on the camera? It sounds from your description of the seals that the hinge-side seals need to be replaced (the single most common issue I've heard about with old Mamiya backs). I'm wondering if something might not have put pressure on the back of the camera, causing the seal to be broken momentarily. Although built like tanks, the RB backs can twist a bit under pressure. (I found this out when I bought my RB and the rotating back needed some attention. It took some force to rotate the back, and I could feel the back flexing a bit as I turned it.)

    Best of luck tracking this down...but I'd bet that if you fix the seal you'll never see this again.

    Be well.
    Dave
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  8. #18
    Pragmatist's Avatar
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    Repair Stuff

    One source of light baffle material (closed cell foam) is:

    http://www.micro-tools.com

    Curt Fargo has a great selection of tools and supplies for a wide range of camera repairs. A good general kit is the LBMM-KIT-2. There is enough foam sheets of different thickness to do several cameras as well as a number of film backs. Do a search for LBMM once you get to the site.

    Cutting the thin strips requires some coordination, a flat metal ruler, and a really sharp exacto knife. A dental pick is really helpful in feeding it correctly in the slots... Cleaning out the old seal is the hardest and messiest part. Use the thicker material for the hinge seal.
    Patrick

    something witty and profound needs to be inserted here...

  9. #19
    Pragmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by t_nunn
    I was really happy with my RB67 until Patrick started talking about cameraleather.com. Now I want to get mine recovered, too. Thanks a lot Patrick ;-) The Indian Red is really sharp, but I also like the Granite.

    I have the 65, 90 and 180 lenses (all C lenses). I had the 127 originally, but it was always either a bit too wide or too long for my taste. The decision to get the 90 was made for me when I dropped the 127 and it had to be replaced.

    I've said it before in a few other threads, but I'll say it here again. RB67's were not made to go underwater. Just a little helpful advice.........

    Sorry Travis, I guess that I am just an instigator....
    Patrick

    something witty and profound needs to be inserted here...

  10. #20
    rogueish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by t_nunn
    I've said it before in a few other threads, but I'll say it here again. RB67's were not made to go underwater. Just a little helpful advice.........
    Glad you cleared that up. It will save me trouble in the future

    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Gilardetti
    it should be made with a strip of sponge, but after some years it turns into a black glueey blob.
    So that is what that was! Exactly what I discovered in one of my backs. Here I thought someone was testing the water seal capacity in a swamp or something. Or maybe it was how t_nunn knows that they are not meant for underwater photography...

    If you can replace this gunk yourself, I recommend it. The two places I inquired, estimated $100-150 (CDN) min, $10 just to look and said it would be at least 2 weeks.

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