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  1. #21
    Mike Kovacs's Avatar
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    Ole, fair enough!

    I'm trying to imagine the effect of rise/shift vs moving the camera. Other than perspective correction, it seems you would get the same effect on background coverage as tilting a rigid lens camera upward.

    My Calumet monorail is way too bulky for though to even consider this an option for MF. One of these days I will be able to afford a nice field camera for LF. In the meantime, the monorail gives me a sore arm for field work
    If it says Zeiss or Rollei, the answer is YES!
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  2. #22
    Ole
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    we're getting way off topic here, but: Keeping the bed stationary and raising both front and back is equivalent to keeping front and back stationary with regards to the camera bed, and then raising the whole camera.
    I don't know the Calumet, but I can assure you that it works just great with a Carbon Infinity. Bellows draw from 30 to 550mm also gives it far more flexibility than any MF camera I happen to own, and since you can focus with front or back independently getting the right framing and perspective is - well, only limited by the photographer's competence.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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  3. #23

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    IMO it depends on what you plan to put on top of the tripod and how you plan to use it. To minimize vibration, ideally one would eschew use of the center post, but many of the new center posts have features that make them desirable, such as hooks to add weight for stability or special adjustments that make awkward positions possible.

    For instance, current Manfrotto 3021 has a center post that can be extracted and repositioned in the top of the tripod to run perpendicular to its normal orientation. I am quite fond of using that feature with my Pentax 67 for images straight below the tripod. I'm not as confident that it would work as easily with the 4x5 due to the weight, but I'm sure it could be done.

    And since the 3021 doesn't quite make it to eye level with its legs fully extended, on occasion, I find it handy to goose it up a bit now and then with my 4x5, and even more on with the 67.

    That same tripod has a feature that looks to be a PITA that permits one to have the tripod legs splayed flat, with the head only inches above the ground. But, it involves actually unscrewing the tripod head from the center column and reattaching it to this little triangular piece. I find it much easier to just invert the center column and work between the legs, or use that perpendicular feature I mentioned earlier.

    Since I am carrying multiple formats in my bag anyway, I find I prefer the flexibility that having a center post provides, but just use it with an eye on minimizing any of the issues it might introduce.

  4. #24

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    I never really thought aboutthe center column until I did not have one. On the other hand I only use it to get the camera closer to the ground. If your tripod gets low enough for you, then why bother with the column. JMO
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  5. #25
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kovacs
    My Calumet monorail is way too bulky for though to even consider this an option for MF. One of these days I will be able to afford a nice field camera for LF. In the meantime, the monorail gives me a sore arm for field work
    Mike, I am having much trouble accepting this comment. The Calumet monorail will do everything and anything you are capable of doing with it. A bit bulkey yes! But a proven proformer through many years of use by thousands of photographers through out the world. I maintain that it is the most view camera for the money ever manufactured. It is limited only by the operator. You may spend tons more money for a view camera that won't deliver any better negative than the Calumet. Your results will be largly be dependent on what you hang on the front of it.

    I am not wanting to argue with you, just state another proven opinion.


    Charlie.................................

    I do use the center column from time to time, it's not a bad thing!

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by game
    hi,
    I am in the run for a new tripod as some may have seen in 'the older gitzo topic'
    I was wondering in this light, how important do you guys consider a center column, wether it's geared or not.
    Is a column less tripod any good? I can imagine the adjusting can me quite a pain when one has to adjust all three legs all the time.

    I am curious about this. Thanks!

    game
    The non-geared columns like the Berlebach tripods need to be handled very carefully when a (heavier) camera is mounted. Berlebach's "adjustable ball column" is an interesting idea but if you're not careful and don't have a good grip on the camera the column can slip and your fingers can get viciously pinched. The camera could end up on the ground as well. A geared column is much better and safer but may be best limited to use with 35 mm and MF - if you want the highest level of rock solid support for your camera.
    Last edited by Changeling1; 05-30-2006 at 11:24 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "A certain amount of contempt for the material employed to express an idea is indispensable to the purest realization of this idea." Man Ray

  7. #27

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    Well,
    You guys certainly made me think a little different. I will be doing LF in the near future. right now it's the pentax 67.
    I bought a cremiallere 3 for 35 dollar, which will leave because it is just a tad too light. And had no adjustable leg spreading.
    I will buy a studex performence this week. It has a adjustable leg spreading angle. And is heavier off course.

    but a reason for this topic is the fact that someone offerd me a F O B A ALFAEE for 100 dollar. only without column.
    The tripod is in great shape and very expensive new. Only I was doubting because it lacked the column.
    Maybe I should buy it. What do you think?

    game

  8. #28

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    I personally can't stand the twist locks on Gitzos. After having owned two, I find them great for the studio, but too easily fouled in the field, too slow to work with, never could get them tight enough, etc. etc. I am much happier with a cam lock system like that of the Bogen, even with the occasional pinch of my hand from the locks. I can set my Bogen up and break it down in less than ten seconds. I think the best I could ever do with a Gitzo was a couple of minutes, and even then I wasn't sure it was going to stay up. Just my two cents. The Gitzo may be fine for your purposes.

  9. #29
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    I have removed the long columns from my 3 Gitzo Carbon Fiber tripods and substituted the short columns for the long columns. Additionally, my Ries H100 also has no center column.

    Quote Originally Posted by kswatapug
    I personally can't stand the twist locks on Gitzos. After having owned two, I find them great for the studio, but too easily fouled in the field, too slow to work with, never could get them tight enough, etc. etc. I am much happier with a cam lock system like that of the Bogen, even with the occasional pinch of my hand from the locks. I can set my Bogen up and break it down in less than ten seconds. I think the best I could ever do with a Gitzo was a couple of minutes, and even then I wasn't sure it was going to stay up. Just my two cents. The Gitzo may be fine for your purposes.
    You may find the Gitzos a little slow to tighten. But, you may have over tightened the twist locks of the Gitzo tripods. Most photographers do. Additionally, the new Gitzos in the 6X Carbon Fiber series have new locks which are easier to turn, release, and lock. Additionally the new tripod legs no longer turn as they telescope in length. In addition, the new feet are easily unscrewed and replaced with spikes.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  10. #30
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by game
    but a reason for this topic is the fact that someone offerd me a F O B A ALFAEE for 100 dollar. only without column.
    The tripod is in great shape and very expensive new. Only I was doubting because it lacked the column.
    Maybe I should buy it. What do you think?

    game
    Well, is it ALFEA or ALFAE? Those are two different models, AFAIK.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

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