Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,489   Posts: 1,542,926   Online: 872
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    10

    Inherited a Hasselblad 500CM: What do I do now?

    OK, this might be the dumbest question ever, but I'm gonna push my luck here...

    I just inherited a Hasselblad 500CM camera house, without lenses, magazine, etc. Since I'm a verified nerd, I was wondering what I need to actually take pictures with this camera... Surfing the net, I've come up with a couple of things:

    - lens
    - viewfinder
    - magazine

    That's it?

    And then we have the 120 film format. How do I decide what format it will use? I mean, I read all about 6x4.5, 6x6, 6x7, etc.

    I do feel like an absolute newbie when it comes to MF (I do have a Leica that I use and love), but I really want to respect the person that left me this camera - and use it. Selling it is not an option, and I'm not one of those guys who think a Hasselblad (or any camera) should gather dust.

    Any help is deeply appreciated

  2. #2
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,780
    Quote Originally Posted by patashnik
    OK, this might be the dumbest question ever, but I'm gonna push my luck here...

    I just inherited a Hasselblad 500CM camera house, without lenses, magazine, etc. Since I'm a verified nerd, I was wondering what I need to actually take pictures with this camera... Surfing the net, I've come up with a couple of things:

    - lens
    - viewfinder
    - magazine

    That's it?

    And then we have the 120 film format. How do I decide what format it will use? I mean, I read all about 6x4.5, 6x6, 6x7, etc.

    I do feel like an absolute newbie when it comes to MF (I do have a Leica that I use and love), but I really want to respect the person that left me this camera - and use it. Selling it is not an option, and I'm not one of those guys who think a Hasselblad (or any camera) should gather dust.

    Any help is deeply appreciated
    - lens (normal is 80mm for 6x6)
    - viewfinder
    - magazine (or two-with dark slides)

    Yes, that is what you will need, and a meter if you don't have one. I'm thinking you might have one already, for the Leica.

    The format of your Hasse is 6x6. Thats it. All the formats you mention are 120 formats used by various cameras. You will get 12 6x6 frames per roll.

    No stupid questions about film cameras exist on APUG.
    You will receive many helpful suggestions from the kind folks here, and the incredible network and information source of film users you have found.
    Welcome.

  3. #3
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Kent, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,364
    Images
    36
    If your camera is without a viewfinder, the most usual choice would be a waist-level finder aka WLF. Magazines do come in 6x6 and 6x4.5 formats, 6x6 is the natural choice. I have not used Hasselblad for a long time, I seem to recall the slightly later magazines are referred to as A12 and are preferred to the earlier "12-on" type. I believe any lens with a leaf (Synchro-Compur) shutter will fit, older is cheaper, more modern is more expensive!

    Regards,

    David

  4. #4
    Jerevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,859
    Images
    9
    Hey Patashnik, I thought you were an RF(F) guy? Welcome!

    Well, seriously, you happened to inherit the least expensive part of the system. Any magazine would work, but an A12 (with the more automatic winding-on versus the C12 which you wind on, looking through a peephole in the back), a standard WLF (no metering in that, but prisms are available, both the H-blad ones and if you wanna get it cheap, the Kiev ones) and finally, the lens.

    I'd start with a normal, 80 mm lens. Shop around and look at prices and condition. The market (at least here, in good old Sweden) is quite flooded with stuff and prices are rather low, compared to what they've been, at least. On the back of the house there's a code starting with two characters followed by a serial number. I suppose you've seen it already, but here you can find out when the camera was made: http://www.photoethnography.com/Clas...html~mainFrame

    Good luck with the hunt!
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  5. #5
    André E.C.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,520
    Images
    12
    And if you`re on a tight budget, take this in consideration!

    http://www.araxfoto.com/accessories/hassel/

    Cheers

    André

  6. #6
    colrehogan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Shooter
    Large Format Pan
    Posts
    2,016
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    16
    They are great cameras to use. I have one body with a waist level finder, one lens (60 mm) and two A12 film magazines. I find that this set up works fine for me and I have not needed/wanted any other lenses for this camera.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,346
    Assuming you're in the U.S., www.keh.com has very decent prices, a wide selection, and very good return policies. I have no connection to them other than having bought all my Hasselblad gear from them.

    I've bought all "bargain" grade stuff except for the film back, which I bought "excellent" as they're a little more finicky. Keh's "bargain" grade stuff is usually better than what many places call "9" or "9+". A "bargain" lens will function perfectly but may have a little wear on the outside. I have one that I can't even figure out why they didn't grade it excellent.

    The only tricky part I've found of Hassies is to ALWAYS make sure the lens and body are cocked when you mount or remove the lens. Otherwise you get the classic "Hasselblad jam" (do a search on the term and you'll find many sites showing how to avoid it and how to remedy it). It's usually able to be corrected with a jeweler's screwdriver and a steady hand, but once you do it once you'll probably never do it again.

  8. #8
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,780
    Quote Originally Posted by David H. Bebbington
    Magazines do come in 6x6 and 6x4.5 formats,


    David
    See, ... I didn't know that. I thought they were 6x6 only. Thats why APUG is so great. I learn something new about photography every day.

  9. #9
    André E.C.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,520
    Images
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Terence
    The only tricky part I've found of Hassies is to ALWAYS make sure the lens and body are cocked when you mount or remove the lens.
    Tricky? Why? It´s just a characteristic of the camera itself!
    Respect that and you will have no trouble, simple!

    Cheers

    André

  10. #10
    arigram's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Crete, Greece
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,474
    Images
    69
    Have fun with it.
    You will soon adjust to the reversed image in the finder and find that the square is not difficult to compose in.
    The only difficulties I have had is to remember to remove the darkslide when I insert a new magazine and to work well its slow and precise focus.
    They all take a bit of habit, that's all.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin