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  1. #11
    Sparky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by afsmithphoto
    As with any uncoated lense you can expect a lack of contrast. Knowing how to use an uncoated lens can produce fine images though. (In B&W at least.) Shoot and develop your images as if you had pre-exposed the film to a small degree.
    I think that as long as one's using good technique, i.e. a good lens shade, etc. - coating isn't exactly the most important thing to image quality.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by afsmithphoto
    What Model Automat is it? If it predates WWII it's likely an uncoated lens. I know because I have a Rollei from this era.

    As with any uncoated lense you can expect a lack of contrast. Knowing how to use an uncoated lens can produce fine images though. (In B&W at least.) Shoot and develop your images as if you had pre-exposed the film to a small degree.

    You can get a fair idea of how old your camera is here:

    http://home.worldonline.dk/rongsted/Rolleisn.htm

    or here:

    http://www.siufai.dds.nl/Rolleiflex35_TLR.htm
    Thanks for the information. I looked up the camera, and it was produced between 1951-53. It is a Rolleiflex Automat MX, with a Xenar 1:3.5/75.

  3. #13

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    The Cerium Oxide was cheap, only around $25 with shipping, and it is one of the things that are used to polish lenses, not just windshields. There are a couple of grades, so this may be a more course grade, but again, you may have nothing to lose. You could send the lens to a repair place and let them fix it, or you could look around to find a telescope builder that is familiar with grinding and polishing their own lenses. Some of the telescope builders get into AR coatings and all sorts of wild stuff, you might get lucky.

  4. #14

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    Hi,

    I'd suggest trying another film using a lensshade and see how it's coming out. Scratches on the *frontlens* have an astonishing low influence on sharpness and contrast as long they are not too many.
    Are you sure that the viewfinder and taking lens are in line? If they are not, you may have slightly unsharp negatives especially in closeups, as unfortunately I have with mine (a 3.5A MX from 52). It's going for CLA next week and will get an new groundglass as well :-)

    cheers

    Ulrich

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ulrich Drolshagen
    Scratches on the *frontlens* have an astonishing low influence on sharpness and contrast as long they are not too many.
    I think this is true - but in a situation like this, it creates a LOT of stray light - so contrast is reduced and so is 'apparent' sharpness.

  6. #16

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    I gave the lens another hard look today, and did spend some time cleaning it with just lens paper and lens cleaning solution. Before I began this process, I wanted to make sure that I wasn't overlooking something obvious. In any event, I'll be off to get some polishing compound and the dremmel and give it a try. After all, I really don't have anything to lose on this camera.

    I'll be out of town for a few days, and I'll begin the process as soon as I return. I'll try to get this done, and post the results at a later date.

    Jeff

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey S. Winn
    I gave the lens another hard look today, and did spend some time cleaning it with just lens paper and lens cleaning solution. Before I began this process, I wanted to make sure that I wasn't overlooking something obvious. In any event, I'll be off to get some polishing compound and the dremmel and give it a try. After all, I really don't have anything to lose on this camera.

    I'll be out of town for a few days, and I'll begin the process as soon as I return. I'll try to get this done, and post the results at a later date.

    Jeff
    Just make sure you start off with something very light - in case that takes care of it. A polishing lube might be a good place to start.

  8. #18
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    Remove the front element, send it to ARAX in the Ukraine and for under $50 including postage you'll have a newly polished and MULTICOATED front element.

    This entire thread is making me sick to my stomach. A Dremel has enough speed to MELT the element. Ridiculous advice. Cerium oxide, by hand, go easy and take your time. Needless to say you do this with the element removed. It would be better to have the coating restored though. I have to assume its a green triangle coated Schneider lens on a 1950 model.
    If it says Zeiss or Rollei, the answer is YES!
    My Flickr Gallery

  9. #19
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    I agree with Mike, either spend the dosh for a recoat or better still use the Rollei as is for that nice old fashioned look that you mentioned. If you shade the lens and photograph with some nice strong lighting you will get that beautiful glow that only these old lenses can give. Enjoy the old girl as she is one of the all time classics.
    Tony

  10. #20

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    Do not polish it, there should be hundreds of cleaning marks before it affecks the image quality. There must be something else wrong with the camera, are the shutter speeds accurate? If not, you are over exposing your film, a much more common reason for a poor image quality. And there can be haze inside the lens, wich can be little tricky to see, you have to use a very strong light, and lit the lens from side.

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